The Heritage of Natural Law: Mark Levin on Rediscovering Americanism

The Constitution safeguards the liberties that the Declaration of Independence represents but did not create.

.. The foundation of Americanism, he posits, is natural law. That does not just spontaneously appear, nor passively persevere. Understanding our natural-law roots, reaffirming our attachment to them in the teeth of the progressive project to supersede them — this is hard work.

.. right reason, “certain definite principles of action from which spring all virtues and whatever is necessary for the proper molding of morals.”

.. “True law is right reason in agreement with nature; it is of universal application, unchanging and everlasting.” It is reason that learning has cultivated for the pursuit of happiness.

.. Natural law is the basis for our conceit that no one may rule over another without his consent.

.. In the absence of natural law, we would be left to the tyranny of will — arbitrary morality and rights, dictated by those who had muscled their way to dominance.

.. For Levin, rationalizing such a muscular state is the 20th-century progressive project spearheaded by

  • Herbert Croly,
  • Theodore Roosevelt,
  • Woodrow Wilson,
  • John Dewey, and their progeny.

They built on the utopian foundation of the “philosopher-kings”:

  • Rousseau’s radical egalitarianism,
  • Hegel’s historicism,
  • Marx’s economic determinism and class struggle, and so on.

The rights of self-determination, self-governance, and private property — the blessings of liberty that are the heritage of natural law — are in peril, if not of extinction, at least of irreversible atrophy.

.. Mark Levin has not been content to inveigh against statism. In the last few years, he has offered concrete plans to roll it back, including a campaign for a convention of the states under Article V of the Constitution, aimed at stripping down Washington from without, since it will never reform itself from within.

Mark Bauerlein Talks to Kelefa Sanneh About the Intellectual Case for Trump

Mark Bauerlein is an unlikely Donald Trump supporter: a socially conservative Catholic intellectual who grew up idolizing Martin Luther King, Jr. He once blogged about his distress at people cursing in public. Bauerlein believes in standards. But, as an English professor at Emory University, he became so concerned about what he sees as the oppressiveness of political correctness that he came to celebrate Trump’s violation of taboos—no matter how cringe-worthy. For Bauerlein, Trump is a figure out of Hegel, a “world-historical figure” who arises at the right time to bring about a necessary change in society.