Does Roy Cohn Rule The Oval Office From The Grave? | Conversations with Jim Zirin

Roy Cohn was an unscrupulous lawyer who knew how
to beat the system. As a lawyer, he lit up the town
representing mobsters, prelates and his poster child
client Donald Trump. For 15 years Cohn was Trump’s
lawyer, fixer and political mentor. Cohn’s cousin, journalist
David Marcus, knows everything knowable about him.
He compares and contrasts for Jim Zirin the many parallels
between Trump’s combative tactics in office and the Roy
Cohn he observed in action.

(Taped: 10/21/2019 )

Trump Playbook: CAP: Confuse, Attack, Point the Finger

07:19
>> IT SEEMS THEY HAVE HAD A RETURN TO CAP, CONFUSE, ATTACK,
RETURN TO CAP, CONFUSE, ATTACK, AND POINT THE FINGER.
AND POINT THE FINGER. THAT IS WHAT THE PRESIDENT AND
THAT IS WHAT THE PRESIDENT AND OTHERS DID AROUND THE MUELLER
OTHERS DID AROUND THE MUELLER REPORT, AND I WOULD SAY THEY
REPORT, AND I WOULD SAY THEY WERE HAPPY WITH HOW THAT HE
WERE HAPPY WITH HOW THAT HE NEEDSED UP, IS THAT WHAT
NEEDSED UP, IS THAT WHAT HAPPENED AGAIN?
HAPPENED AGAIN? >> THAT IS EXACTLY RIGHT,
THAT IS EXACTLY RIGHT, THEY’RE RETURNING TO THIS
THEY’RE RETURNING TO THIS FAMILIAR PLAY BOOK TRYING TO
FAMILIAR PLAY BOOK TRYING TO DISTRACT BY BRINGING UP THE
DISTRACT BY BRINGING UP THE BIDEN’S AT EVERY OPPORTUNITY,
BIDEN’S AT EVERY OPPORTUNITY, AND JUST TRYING TO RIDE OUT THIS
AND JUST TRYING TO RIDE OUT THIS STORM, BUT THE PROBLEM THAT THE
STORM, BUT THE PROBLEM THAT THE WHITE HOUSE FACES RIGHT NOW IS
WHITE HOUSE FACES RIGHT NOW IS THAT THERE IS A SET OF FACTS
THAT THERE IS A SET OF FACTS THAT ARE JUST DAMAGING FOR THE
THAT ARE JUST DAMAGING FOR THE PRESIDENT, NO OTHER WAY TO PUT
PRESIDENT, NO OTHER WAY TO PUT THAT, AND YOU’RE SEEING THE
THAT, AND YOU’RE SEEING THE PRESIDENT’S REPUBLICAN ALLIES
PRESIDENT’S REPUBLICAN ALLIES ARE GIVING THESE TALKING POINTS
ARE GIVING THESE TALKING POINTS THAT SORT OF LACK INTELLECTUAL
THAT SORT OF LACK INTELLECTUAL CONSISTENCY, AND KEVIN McCAR
CONSISTENCY, AND KEVIN McCAR THINK GOT A LOT OF CRITICISM FOR
THINK GOT A LOT OF CRITICISM FOR THE INTERVIEW HE GAVE OVER THE
THE INTERVIEW HE GAVE OVER THE WEEKEND WHERE HE COULD NOT PUT
WEEKEND WHERE HE COULD NOT PUT TOGETHER A FORCEFUL AND STRONG
TOGETHER A FORCEFUL AND STRONG AND BELIEVABLE DEFENSE OF THE
AND BELIEVABLE DEFENSE OF THE GOVERNMENT.
GOVERNMENT. AT I AT THE WHITE HOUSE THEY’RE
AT I AT THE WHITE HOUSE THEY’RE TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO
TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO NAVIGATE ALL OF THIS.

The 38 most bizarre lines from Donald Trump’s wild impromptu news conference

14. “In my opinion, you vote for a Democrat, you’re being very disloyal to Jewish people and you’re being very disloyal to Israel. And only weak people would say anything other than that.”
Yes, Trump is doubling down on his very controversial “dual loyalty” claims here. But he’s also revealing what he believes to be the worst trait in a person: Being “weak.”
15. “I think that if you vote for a Democrat, you’re very, very disloyal to Israel and to the Jewish people.”
He never, ever backs down. No matter what. He believes it to be a sign of, wait for it, weakness.
.. 24. “We’re building tremendous numbers of miles of wall right now in different locations. It all comes together likes a beautiful puzzle.”

As of July, 46.7 miles of the border wall had been built. So, lot of puzzle pieces still out there.
.. 28. “There are many, many things in play. People are talking about videos. People are talking about lots of different things. But we do have a way of bringing what we already have, because we have many, many — as you know, we have many, many people that are unable to buy guns right now. Many people are unable to buy guns.”

Trump regularly talks in circles. But when he talks about guns and the way forward on gun control(or not) he takes it to a whole other level.
29. “And you know, we can’t let that slope go so easy that we’re talking about background checks, then all of a sudden we’re talking about, ‘Let’s take everybody’s gun away.'”
This is a favorite argument of the NRA but bears very little connection to reality. Making sure everyone who buys a gun has to submit to a background check isn’t even on the same planet as the government coming to peoples’ houses and demanding they turn their guns over. Ridiculous.
.. 32. “I went to the hospitals. It was totally falsely reported. There were beautiful, beautiful, very sad, you know, horrible moments. But there were beautiful moments, in the sense that these people — the families and also the people that were so badly injured that I was with — they love our country.”

This is Trump on his hospital visit to victims of mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas. Very beautiful. Also sad. And horrible. But also beautiful.
33. “So when I went to Dayton, and when I went to El Paso, and I went into those hospitals, the love for me — and me, maybe, as a representative of the country — but for me — and my love for them was unparalleled.”
So, the big takeaway from Trump’s visits to mass shooting victims was that they really loved him. Like, a lot.
34. “The doctors were coming out of the operating rooms. There were hundreds and hundreds of people all over the floor. You couldn’t even walk on it.”
So, according to the President, doctors stopped operating on patients in order to come out and meet him? OK! Very legal and very cool!

A Look at Trump’s ‘Crisis’ Management (Trump Playbook)

A LOOK AT TRUMP’S ‘CRISIS’ MANAGEMENT
By Alexandra D’Elia, @Alex_DElia11
Politics production assistant

President Donald Trump uses many negotiating strategies. But some of them follow a similar pattern:

  1. creating leverage with a threat;
  2. using the threat to escalate tension or create a crisis;
  3. backing down from the threat; and then
  4. claiming victory when the crisis is averted.

Trump’s threat to impose tariffs on Mexico unless the country reached a deal with the U.S on immigration is just the latest example. Let’s take a look at some other instances.

Mexico tariff threat: Trump announced May 30 that he would impose a 5 percent tariff on Mexican goods coming into the U.S., and increase the tariff percentage over the summer until the country took action to reduce the rise in migrants trying to enter the U.S. at the southern border. Economists, Democrats and some Republicans warned that the threats would cause economic harm to both nations. But Trump announced in a tweet Friday night that the U.S. reached a signed agreement with Mexico and the tariffs were “hereby indefinitely suspended.” The joint declaration says that Mexico agreed to deploy its National Guard to address the crisis, though officials say that agreement was already made in March.

U.S.-Mexico border shutdown: In another effort to curb illegal migration from Mexico, Trump announced on March 29 that he would shut down America’s southern border to Mexico the following week unless Mexican authorities took action. Trump then said in Florida that there was a “very good likelihood” that he would close the border, “and that is just fine with me.” Economists warnedthat a border shutdown would be economically crippling. Less than a week later, on April 4, the president said that he would give Mexico a “one-year warning” before closing the border. He then warned of imposing auto tariffs on Mexican goods instead, which he did two months later.

Negotiations with North Korea: Following North Korea’s weapons tests in 2017, Trump told the U.N. General Assembly the U.S. would have “no choice but to totally destroy North Korea” if the country attacked. He called Kim Jong Un “Little Rocket Man” and said that he was “on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime.” The rhetoric sparked fears of a possible armed conflict between the two countries. Kim responded that Trump would “pay dearly” for his threats. Trump and Kim met in Singapore in June of 2018, where Trump said he would halt “very provocative” U.S.-South Korea military exercises and touted his relationship with Kim. Trump claimed the summit as a major foreign policy victory. A year of verbal tiffs followed, along with a failed second summitin February in Hanoi, Vietnam. Trump said today that he had a very good relationship with North Korea, and pointed to a “very warm” letter he received yesterday from Kim.

Pulling out of NATO: The president said in July of 2018 at a NATO summit in Brussels that he would be “unhappy” if other countries did not “up their commitments” to the alliance, but that “everyone has agreed to”do so. Some foreign leaders disputed Trump’s claim. In January of this year, The New York Times reported that Trump suggested several times last year that the U.S. withdraw from the alliance, which America has been a member of for 70 years. Trump’s criticism of NATO as a candidate and president has worried allies who argue the U.S. should maintain its ties to NATO and other international alliances.

General Motors subsidies cut: In May of 2018, Trump threatened to cut all federal subsidies to General Motors after the organization announced that it would close its plants in Ohio, Michigan and Maryland. “Nothing being closed in Mexico & China. The U.S. saved General Motors, and this is the THANKS we get!” Trump tweeted at the time. General Motors shares fell 3.5 percent. Trump never cut subsidies to the auto giant.  Last month, Trump claimed victory when General Motors announced that it would sell its Lordstown, Ohio, plant to an electric truck manufacturer. Trump tweeted: “With all the car companies coming back, and much more, THE USA IS BOOMING!”