US General: US to Finish Off 7 Muslim Countries in 5 Years

 

AMY GOODMAN: Do you see a replay in what happened in the lead-up to the war with Iraq — the allegations of the weapons of mass destruction, the media leaping onto the bandwagon?

GEN. WESLEY CLARK: Well, in a way. But, you know, history doesn’t repeat itself exactly twice. What I did warn about when I testified in front of Congress in 2002, I said if you want to worry about a state, it shouldn’t be Iraq, it should be Iran. But this government, our administration, wanted to worry about Iraq, not Iran.

I knew why, because I had been through the Pentagon right after 9/11. About 10 days after 9/11, I went through the Pentagon, and I saw Secretary Rumsfeld and Deputy Secretary Wolfowitz. I went downstairs just to say hello to some of the people on the Joint Staff who used to work for me, and one of the generals called me in. He said, “Sir, you’ve got to come in and talk to me a second.” I said, “Well, you’re too busy.” He said, “No, no.” He says, “We’ve made the decision we’re going to war with Iraq.” This was on or about the 20th of September. I said, “We’re going to war with Iraq? Why?” He said, “I don’t know.” He said, “I guess they don’t know what else to do.” So I said, “Well, did they find some information connecting Saddam to al-Qaeda?” He said, “No, no.” He says, “There’s nothing new that way. They just made the decision to go to war with Iraq.” He said, “I guess it’s like we don’t know what to do about terrorists, but we’ve got a good military, and we can take down governments.” And he said, “I guess if the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem has to look like a nail.”

So I came back to see him a few weeks later, and by that time we were bombing in Afghanistan. I said, “Are we still going to war with Iraq?” And he said, “Oh, it’s worse than that.” He reached over on his desk. He picked up a piece of paper. And he said, “I just got this down from upstairs” — meaning the secretary of defense’s office — “today.” And he said, “This is a memo that describes how we’re going to take out seven countries in five years, starting with Iraq, and then Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and, finishing off, Iran.” I said, “Is it classified?” He said, “Yes, sir.” I said, “Well, don’t show it to me.” And I saw him a year or so ago, and I said, “You remember that?” He said, “Sir, I didn’t show you that memo! I didn’t show it to you!”

 

 

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How does Marine boot camp deal with recruits who act like Borat?

Dealing with non conformity is a favorite Drill Instructor pastime. When expert marksmanship badges were handed out, I wasn’t paying attention and thanked the Platoon Commander rather than just acknowledging him with a “Yes Sir”.

Later the Drill Instructor’s brim of his Smokey Bear beat my forehead underneath the brim of my cover. “Seems like someone here still wants to be an individual!” This is usually followed by a sprinting of side straddle hops, hello dollys, push ups and leg lifts on the Quarter Deck.

Believe me….there are worse things than conformity. In California where I went to school, students that fell asleep in the classroom were required to pick up and hold the tailhook of an F-4 Phantom in the back of the class. That alone convinced me that if I had to stand to stay awake then I needed to stand.

People that chewed tobacco during formation were addressed by the Plt Sgt long enough until it was necessary to swallow it while answering his questions. Oh yes, there are things that are worse than conformity.

How US Aircraft Carriers Defend Themselves When Surrounded

 

In the 1990s a naval exercise was held between friendly NATO sea powers. During the first exercise a US carrier was sunk by a Dutch submarine without the escorting destroyers and aircraft ever finding or catching it. They simply ignored the outcome and restarted the exercise pretending it never happened. The Dutch submarine captain was berated for going outside of the script. Just saying..
I am wondering how all of the impressive vessels and weapons can combat the new enemy, climate change. We barely even realize we are being attacked. Insidious, slow motion asphyxiation.
the Swedish were able to “sink” an US carrier during exercise 2003, the France 2009 and the Italian 2013, all Nations were able to pass rough the defensiv “Shield” of the carrier fleet!!! that’s why the US has in 2020 chosen to buy an Italian*French frigate as their new ship against submarine and other hazards!!! but i always love this US propaganda machine, never mentioning any failure
0:25 good job hiding that environment friendly smoke
Things like this make me sleep good!!! God bless🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸
All good and well, the Germans thought the BISMARK was unsinkable with its heavy steel plating and huge guns, they all have an Achilles heel. Hopefully this will never be tested. I always said aircraft carriers were floating ducks in the water due too their size and slow speed. God bless and protect all those who sail on her.
May God keep America the strong 💪💠🇺🇸🙏💐
 @Anthony Casso  I’m only speculating.. Missiles can travel many times the speed of sound, many times faster than jets. Yes, satellites will pick up a barrage of incoming missiles, and missiles can have many times the explosive power than the largest of cannons on ships, meaning that when they talk about all the bulkheads that can seal off compartments to keep a ship from sinking, a direct hit from a large missile, my guess, would do BIG damage period. Also missiles have their own radar etc. guidance systems as well as pre planned flight maneuvers,, they don’t have to come straight down at a ship, they can spiral, zig zag, whatever. Hard to lock onto with a rapid fire cannon especially when there are another 99 missiles coming in at the same time. The cost of 100 missiles is a fraction of the cost of one of these carriers. Not to mention stealth submarine technology. As mentioned before, satellites can chart the exact location of each and every carrier 24/7. Would not surprise me that for each super carrier we have there is a sub following it.
Isn’t the current naval doctrine of the US and allies at risk given China and Russia’s advances in anti-ship missile warfare, against which the west has little in the way of countermeasures?
Thank god for Uncle Sam. Respect from 🇬🇧
Nothing can inspire you early in the morning like this video. GOD BLESS united States of American for ever…..
Nothing is unsinkable. Japanese thought yamato was invincible.
The best defense is not to send them to combat or don’t start one and waste tax payer’s money!
Thank God I’m an American and we got these things to protect us. 🇺🇸 🦅
+Wild Iron This video is at the level of its outstanding contents. The highhest of the highest. The US is at sea, number one in front of China and Russia and the whole of Europe. A century would not be enough to China to level the US at sea. WONDERFUL, ASTONISHING, IMPRESSIVE AND MARVELLOUS EVERYTHING I SAW IN THIS VIDEO. CONGRATS TO ALL OF YOU WHO TOOK PART ON THIS PROJECT!
People forget that it only takes one nuke to sink a whole fleet
For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. John 3:16 KJV, Jesus Christ is the only way……….
Pride of The Department of War!
These ships, ships, planes, missiles are beautiful from a distance, but these are ambassadors of death, who knows how many children and innocents have been killed by these beautiful weapons? I hate every war and every weapon of war in the whole world, I dream of a world without war and bloodshed and without any weapons of war for humanity

Did being in the military change your perspective of America?

Being in the Army changed my perspective of America in several ways. Perhaps the most significant of these was the realization of the power of the press in the United States.

It is vital for operational security that the public not be made aware of everything going on in a war, but it goes way beyond that.

In coordination with the armed forces and the federal government, the press tightly controls what information is released to the populace.

One example of this is the ban on the media taking images of flag-draped coffins being returned to the US from Iraq and Afghanistan. These aren’t coffins per se, but instead, they are known as “transfer cases” used to transport the body back to their loved ones.

Other examples were how the war was spun from the perspective of indigenous people of a nation and misleading the country as to how long we were planning on keeping troops in the country.

It was like parents keeping delicate information from a small child. The attitude was, “They don’t need to know.” I don’t see it as a cover-up, but rather a careful picking and choosing information. Those choices occurred way above my pay grade.

** “You have arrived at your destination.”

I remember calling home and having my family say things like, “Sounds like you guys should be home in a few weeks.” All I could say to them at the time was something like, “That’s not going to happen.”

At the time, we had plans for extended deployments and troop rotations lasting years into the future.

I didn’t think I was naive, but one day the obviousness of it all smacked me upside the head, and I realized, “They (the American people) only know what they (the government and press) want them to know.”

The US military is poisoning the water in O’ahu

As Director for the Sierra Club of Hawai’i Wayne Tanaka recently wrote in The Guardian, the US Navy’s Red Hill Fuel Storage Facility is “a massive underground ‘farm’ of 18-million liter fuel tanks and pipes just 100 feet above metropolitan O’ahu. Its construction began before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Since then, it has leaked over 180,000 gallons of petroleum into the groundwater aquifer that provides drinking water for over 400,000 residents and visitors from Hālawa to Hawaiʻi Kai.”

Regardless of the major threat the facility poses to the local water system and demands from Native Hawaiians and supporters to address the crisis and hold the US military accountable, it wasn’t until hundreds of military families living near Pearl Harbor reported symptoms of petroleum poisoning that Red Hill’s operations were paused in late November. But the root causes of the environmental and public health crisis remain untouched and the fight to shut down Red Hill is still very much ongoing. In this segment of The Marc Steiner Show, Marc speaks about that fight with Mikey Inouye, an independent filmmaker born and raised in Hawai‘i, community organizer, and member of O‘ahu Water Protectors. The O‘ahu Water Protectors is an organization that formed out of a coalition of Kānaka Maoli organizers, Sierra Club members and supporters, Hawai‘i Peace and Justice, and other groups working toward sovereignty, decolonization, and demilitarization.

Where was the first place that you felt truly at home?

Its kind of odd, but I thought I felt at home in sunny Cali since I lived there from 2 years old. I didn’t realize that I didn’t really know what being home felt like, until I went to bootcamp for the Marines at age 20. I remember our first PFT, straggling in slow where the senior DI called a few of us out saying we weren’t going to make it. For the first time, I felt really at home and good because we were all the same in every way. It was strangely comforting. The senior DI kept asking for me every week to see if I was there. I made it, dropped 58–60 lbs, 300 PFT, and was yoked out. Senior DI Chavez gave me the firmest handshake at graduation and wished me well.

Fast forward to the age of 44. I lived a great life and experienced cool things all over as an American. I felt an ever bigger feeling of being “home,” once I visited S Korea for a short vacation. I rushed home, sold all, quit all, and severed most ties. I moved as quickly as I could and I’m 48 (Korean age) today! Bootcamp was the first, but this move was the most powerful. Everything and every part of me wanted to move back. It’s been fulfilling, amazing in timing, and I’m a new person. I consider this move to be the first, since it was so moving and meaningful for me. The Corps still has a part of my heart and loyalty, but the rest is with and in S Korea. I even enjoy hospital visits now.