INFJ Assumes the Role of Common Enemy to Unite the Group

isms and stuff you can’t really you can
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use those to an extent but you know
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everybody’s a little different me
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personally I think I’m a more goofy
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sarcastic infj I can be serious I think
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it’s I think it’s a lot about like I
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said everything evolves around your
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environment and who you’re around okay
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and your circle of friends or
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acquaintances in this case for infj is
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could you I don’t have a whole lot of
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friends which is not a bad thing by the
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way I don’t ever assume it’s a bad thing
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uh I have a group that I am more the
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serious straight man in and the more
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concrete rationalized analytical mind in
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that group but I also have groups that I
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am the clown I’m the jokester I
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basically I know J’s in my personal
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opinion assumed the role that is most
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necessary for whatever group or
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organization they become a part of so if
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the organization is missing that
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level-headed the structured thinker I
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will do my best to become that isn’t
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necessarily my strong point probably not
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but I will try to do it anyway if I feel
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like I need to be the bad guy in the
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group I will become that bad guy so one
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thing to keep in mind is that I know
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Jays are very capable of becoming
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extremely despotic and tyrants all the
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biggest tyrants and then despots and and
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all those kind of people in the world
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like Hitler and all that where INF
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J’s at the same time some of the
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greatest philosophical minds people who
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pushed society into a more positive
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direction and things like that like
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Gandhi and stuff Brian of JS as well so
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we’re bit were capable of either role so
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it’s all about it’s all about how you’re
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shaped by your environment and the
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people you interact with and meet you
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can very much Teeter on either edge
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there’s also RJ’s are very complicated
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to write because I’m very capable evil
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I’ve done evil in the past what I would
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consider evil to people but I do those
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things because I see them necessary I
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very much see
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like when I was talking about conflict I
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very much feel sometimes conflict is
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necessary sometimes lies are necessary
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and I will do those things if I feel
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like I can benefit the people involved
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I’ve had groups in the past where I’m
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taking the role of the bad guy the the
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guy who who will say things that
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triggers people gets them upset it’s
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very much it’s almost it’s almost
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considered like a martyr complex but at
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the same time it’s almost more of just
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this being annoying I actually find
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actually weird feeling to be extremely
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obnoxious to be honest makes me do
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things I don’t really want to do I
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always it always leads me to this
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demonizing my life and doing things and
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making decisions based on this because I
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want to make other people happy I don’t
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do enough of this to feel it what makes
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me happy and what I value and what’s
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important to me because this is weak I
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don’t know how to do these things
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properly when I do figure them out so I
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ended up just naturally catering to
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other people there’s times I’ve
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sacrificed myself for groups taking the
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blame for things that I don’t need to
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take the blame for for the most part
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I’ll just let that happen to me
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I’ve gotten better at not letting it
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happen but it’s always gonna naturally
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have and I’ve always kind of fallen into
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this I think it’s just because you get
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so comfortable playing that role it
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eventually just becomes into natural and
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an everyday part of your life
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I have groups that I’ve played that role
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in and you know every once in a while
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there’s always like that one or two
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people you know hilariously one of my
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friends that I talked to a lot it’s hard
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to say if we’re even friends or not but
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I for whatever reason I’m always like
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extremely comfortable we were just
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sharing some really private things with
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her and like bouncing a lot of ideas and
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things offer her she was in a group that
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we were in together where I was
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basically like everybody knew who I was
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this wasn’t a this wasn’t an MMO we
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played everybody in the server knew who
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I was and I was basically the number-one
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villain in that entire game server
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across thousands of people everybody
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knew who I was
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there was forum posts about me all the
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time and how
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much of a scumbag I was how vile I was
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and I took that role in our group mostly
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for unification purposes because people
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weren’t getting along so I pretty much
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became the bad guy in order to help push
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the group in order to achieve things and
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the group ended up becoming the number
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ones and you serve Gildan server for a
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long time I think they still are and I
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have a lot of archived at villainous
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posts to both have myself in that game
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it’s pretty funny actually I think I
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think they have I think they still keep
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my character active then they just kind
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of rename it and around to fit and
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they kind of use it as like almost like
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a statue now of remember remember the
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villain it’s pretty funny but this is
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this girl in particular understood like
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she could see I know I don’t know what
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type she is I never bothered and really
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care but you know she could see she
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understood what I was doing and she’s
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somebody that it was really painful for
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me to actually do those things but
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because she understood what I was doing
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and I could talk to her about it and and
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and and she understood what was
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happening what I was trying to do it was
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easier for me that way so there’s always
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gonna be people who can see and
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understand the hidden meaning behind
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your actions so don’t think there won’t
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be so there’s always going to be people
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out there for you you’re not going to be
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misunderstood forever there are people
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who do understand and so oh that’s it
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man this video is extremely long I
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apologize I have nothing else I don’t
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know what to say guys you have any
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questions or comments let me know your 9
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MJ you want to talk about things I guess
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that’s that’s everything that’s
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everything I’m pretty sure
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yeah
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goodbye

Richard Rohr Meditation: Courageous Nonviolence

Thomas Merton writes, “Non-violence implies a kind of bravery far different from violence.” [3] Our dualistic minds see evil as black and white and that the only solution is to eliminate evil. Nonviolence, on the other hand, comes from an awareness that I am also the enemy and my response is part of the whole moral equation. I cannot destroy the other without destroying myself. I must embrace my enemy just as much as I must welcome my own shadow. Both acts take real and lasting courage.

Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) coined a new term, satyagraha, because “passive resistance” didn’t capture his mission. Satyagraha combines the Sanskrit word sat—that which is, being, or truth—with graha—holding firm to or remaining steadfast in. It is often translated as “truth force” or “soul force.”

.. To create peaceful change, we must begin by remembering who we are in God. Gandhi believed the core of our being is union with God. From this awareness, nonviolence must flow naturally and consistently:

Non-violence is not a garment to be put on and off at will. Its seat is in the heart, and it must be an inseparable part of our very being. . . . If love or non-violence be not the law of our being, the whole of my argument falls to pieces

.. Regardless of what name we call the divine, Gandhi believed that experiencing God’s loving presence within is central to nonviolence. This was his motivation and sustenance as he fasted for peace, as he embraced the untouchables (whom he called “Children of God”)

Richard Rohr Meditation: The Root of Violence

The root of violence is the illusion of separation—from God, from Being itself, from being one with everyone and everything. When you don’t know you are connected and one, you will invariably resort to some form of violence to get the dignity and power you lack.

.. When you can become little enough, naked enough, and honest enough, then you will ironically find that you are more than enough. At this place of poverty and freedom, you have nothing to prove and nothing to protect. Here you can connect with everything and everyone. Everything belongs. This cuts violence at its very roots before there is even a basis for fear or greed—the things that usually cause us to be angry, suspicious, and violent.

.. To be clear, it is inconceivable that a true believer would be racist, anti-Semitic, xenophobic, homophobic, or bigoted toward any group or individual, especially toward the poor, which seems to be an acceptable American prejudice. In order to end the cycle of violence, our fight must flow from our authentic identity as Love.

..  I founded the Center for Action and Contemplation thirty years ago was to give activists some grounding in spirituality so they could continue working for social change, but from a stance much different than vengeance, ideology, or willpower pressing against willpower.

Most activists I knew loved Gandhi’s and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s teachings on nonviolence. But it became clear to me that many of them had only an intellectual appreciation rather than a participation in the much deeper mystery. I often saw people on the Left playing the victim and creating victims of others who were not like them. The ego was still in charge. It was still a power game, not the science of love that Jesus taught us.

..  It takes a lifetime, I think. This kind of action, rooted in one’s True Self, comes from a deeper knowing of what is real, good, true, and beautiful, beyond labels and dualistic judgments of right or wrong. From this place, our energy is positive and has the most potential to create change for the good. This stance is precisely what we mean by “being in prayer.” We must pray “unceasingly” to maintain this posture.

.. Wait in prayer, but don’t wait for absolutely perfect motivation or we will never act. Radical union with God and neighbor is our starting place, not private perfection. Contemplation offers a way to make our action sustainable and lasting over the long haul, without being overly defended or cynical.