Ignorant Police don’t know the law: Unlawful Detention

 

  • This cop seems like if he was to go back and actually learn the law, he will be a good officer.
    • I actually thought he was a nice guy. I think he will be a good officer.
    • I agree. He’s clearly trying. It’s really unfortunate that he hasn’t recieved proper training. I hope he decides on his own to learn and doesn’t wait on his department.
  • Even though he doesn’t know the law or his job from his ass or a hole in the ground, he was actually pretty humble, probably the most humble cop I’ve ever seen!

 

  • I agree. This cop wasn’t a bad guy. He was a victim of our utterly incompetent police training system.

 

  • I’m glad he was educated and I hope he follows what he learned on this interaction, as well as stopping any fellow officer from trying to do the same. That being said it’s sad that the people have to teach these officers the law.
  • I wouldn’t say he got “owned” in this case. He got “educated”. He was very cordial and even admitted he may not have known but within his knowledge he was doing what was taught. Far better than other engagements I see!

 

  • The cop was honest and admitted he was in the wrong and even apologized. I hope he continues to learn and grow we need more like him
  • “I do not think you have committed a crime.” At this point the officer needs to walk away from this citizen.
  • I’m glad the officer realized his mistake. He was humble and apologized and learned something for future cases!

 

  • Not a bad cop lol 😂 right he tried to violate him & his children by enforcing a law that doesn’t exist that’s a crime in it’s self ………..
  •  @asifig2F  he didn’t say he wasn’t a bad cop. He’s clearly pretty clueless (as was the suspect tbh), but he seems like a decent guy. He was genuinely ignorant, but he tried to actually explain himself and didn’t seem to be motivated by ego. I think he’d be a good officer with proper training.
  •  @asifig2F  Lets be real, the type of police we see on this channel, he isn’t one of them. this is one of the better police we have seen, polite, trying to be through and courteous with genuine reasons for asking the questions.
  •  @asifig2F  That cop is a great person. He even admitted and apolgized for the inconvience caused by him. He was trying to do his job just like any hard working man.
  •  @asifig2F  its a systematic problem. anyone can be blind to stuff like that when they are not taught by the system you cant always expect people to know better

 

  • Where did you get your degree? Are you an attorney?” Cops seriously need to stop asking this question, unless they obtained law degrees on the side.
    • It’s because its too hard for most police to understand. Every video when someone refers to the constitution they ask if the citizen is a lawyer. This is very revealing. Its says that the bill of rights is so complicated to the average police officer they think you need to go to college for 7 years to understand just 10 simple ideas that are less than 500 words combined.
    • Every time a cop asks where you got your law degree, that should be grounds for immediate firing. “Uh oh, another citizen far more versed in the law than me, I better try and make him feel stupid.” This should be every cops ticket to the unemployment line.
  • This is probably one of the best cops I’ve seen in one of these videos. I honestly believe he thought he was in the right, and he was man enough to admit it when he found out he was wrong. I’ve seen lots where the supervisor comes to tell the person they are free to go and tries to save face for the cop in the wrong, who doesn’t show his face again.
  • “You do not have to be committing a crime to be detained”, that is not what the 4th Amendment says. Not answering questions is the right guaranteed by the the 5th Amendment.
  • Keep in mind. This officer has the power to ruin your life. And he has absolutely no idea how to do his job. Give me a break. This guy is a walking liability for the department and the city.
  • I feel he was honest and likely appreciative that you were there on this. Don’t know how long he’s been out of the academy, but I’m glad he’s not head strong like many. He was very professional even though uninformed. Hopefully things go well for him in his LE career.
  • Honestly, the officer kept his cool and remained fairly respectful throughout, his downfall here is his complete lack of training. I feel like he could still be an effective officer with some better training. Just my 2¢ worth.
  • The difference between this cop and others I’ve seen is although this one waa wrong he didn’t become aggressive or start trying to escalate the situation even though he was clearly finding the situation difficult. He also learned during the situation he was wrong and apologised. He seems like a good guy let down by poor training.
  • I agree with your statement about him being a good officer. But how does the academy pass these officers thru without them knowing the basics of the law. I believe the academy teaches them to get that ID no matter what
  • This guy should turn out to be a good officer once he learns the law. He seems to want to be fair and that is a good start. I believe he is a good man.
  • When the cop need to explain what he learned in training about the law, you know he’s done. This is a good one. =)

Lambo Owner Outplays Officer With Professionalism

It’s sad that we as Civilians have to be calm and professional when dealing with so called trained PEACE officers..

Imagine a world where the citizens are the ones who have to deescalate a situation instead of the “trained professionals”.

It looks like Officer Torres has taken WAY too much of his own advice to stop thinking.

What Underlies the G.O.P. Commitment to Ignorance?

As everyone knows, leftists hate America’s military. Recently, a prominent left-wing media figure attacked Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declaring, “He’s not just a pig, he’s stupid.”

Oh, wait. That was no leftist, that was Fox News’s Tucker Carlson. What set Carlson off was testimony in which Milley told a congressional hearing that he considered it important “for those of us in uniform to be open-minded and widely read.”

The problem is obvious. Closed-mindedness and ignorance have become core conservative values, and those who reject these values are the enemy, no matter what they may have done to serve the country.

The Milley hearing was part of the orchestrated furor over “critical race theory,” which has dominated right-wing media for the past few months, getting close to 2,000 mentions on Fox so far this year. One often sees assertions that those attacking critical race theory have no idea what it’s about, but I disagree; they understand that it has something to do with assertions that America has a history of racism and of policies that explicitly or implicitly widened racial disparities.

And such assertions are unmistakably true. The Tulsa race massacre really happened, and it was only one of many such incidents. The 1938 underwriting manual for the Federal Housing Administration really did declare that “incompatible racial groups should not be permitted to live in the same communities.”

We can argue about the relevance of this history to current policy, but who would argue against acknowledging simple facts?

The modern right, that’s who. The current obsession with critical race theory is a cynical attempt to change the subject away from the Biden administration’s highly popular policy initiatives, while pandering to the white rage that Republicans deny exists. But it’s only one of multiple subjects on which willful ignorance has become a litmus test for anyone hoping to succeed in Republican politics.

Thus, to be a Republican in good standing one must deny the reality of man-made climate change, or at least oppose any meaningful action to limit greenhouse gas emissions. One must reject or at least express skepticism about the theory of evolution. And don’t even get me started on things like the efficacy of tax cuts.

What underlies this cross-disciplinary commitment to ignorance? On each subject, refusing to acknowledge reality serves special interests. Climate denial caters to the fossil fuel industry; evolution denial caters to religious fundamentalists; tax-cut mysticism caters to billionaire donors.

But there’s also, I’d argue, a spillover effect: Accepting evidence and logic is a sort of universal value, and you can’t take it away in one area of inquiry without degrading it across the board. That is, you can’t declare that honesty about America’s racial history is unacceptable and expect to maintain intellectual standards everywhere else. In the modern right-wing universe of ideas, everything is political; there are no safe subjects.

This politicization of everything inevitably creates huge tension between conservatives and institutions that try to respect reality.

There have been many studies documenting the strong Democratic lean of college professors, which is often treated as prima facie evidence of political bias in hiring. A new law in Florida requires that each state university conduct an annual survey “which considers the extent to which competing ideas and perspectives are presented,” which doesn’t specifically mandate the hiring of more Republicans but clearly gestures in that direction.

An obvious counterargument to claims of biased hiring is self-selection: How many conservatives choose to pursue careers in, say, sociology? Is hiring bias the reason police officers seem to have disproportionately supported Donald Trump in the 2016 election, or is this simply a reflection of the kind of people who choose careers in law enforcement?

But beyond that, the modern G.O.P. is no home for people who believe in objectivity. One striking feature of surveys of academic partisanship is the overwhelming Democratic lean in hard sciences like biology and chemistry; but is that really hard to understand when Republicans reject science on so many fronts?

One recent study marvels that even finance departments are mainly Democratic. Indeed, you might expect finance professors, some of whom do lucrative consulting for Wall Street, to be pretty conservative. But even they are repelled by a party committed to zombie economics.

Which brings me back to General Milley. The U.S. military has traditionally leaned Republican, but the modern officer corps is highly educated, open-minded and, dare I say it, even a bit intellectual — because those are attributes that help win wars.

Unfortunately, they are also attributes the modern G.O.P. finds intolerable.

So something like the attack on Milley was inevitable. Right-wingers have gone all in on ignorance, so they were bound to come into conflict with every institution — including the U.S. military — that is trying to cultivate knowledge.

That momement when he realizes he put a Jim Crowe era slogan in the bill claiming isn’t voter-suppression

Rep. Anchía Questions Author of Texas Voter Suppression Bill

The New Feudalism: A lot of our Problems are Education Problems

13:31
climate change is an education problem
13:33
mm-hmm okay the numbers tell E Barrett
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out the percentage of people with PhDs
13:37
who don’t believe climate change is real
13:40
is trivial the percent if you have
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master’s degrees is maybe a little
13:43
higher but right if if you double the
13:46
percentage of Americans with a college
13:48
degree there’d be no problem of climate
13:50
change denial in this country and then
13:52
what that would mean is the world would
13:55
not would have a would actually have a
13:57
shot at maybe addressing it in a way
13:59
that right now looks unlikely a lot of
14:02
our problems are education problems in
14:04
disguise
14:05
because the ability to believe in fake
14:08
things is essential to upholding the
14:12
kind of system that we have otherwise
14:14
how do you explain in a democracy a
14:17
system that doesn’t work for most people
14:18
it makes no sense well people have to be
14:22
persuaded to believe in things that are
14:24
not real the democracies become a
14:26
plutonomy where the power of that vote
14:29
is diminished and the more you can
14:31
manipulate people as you just described
14:33
the more power the money has relative to
14:37
the individual and I’ve been trying to
14:38
help people see the connections between
14:40
each of these stories you know I was
14:42
just saying today you know we have a
14:44
story in the news of Michael Bloomberg
14:46
giving 1.8 billion to John Hopkins very
14:48
nice gift but why does he have that
14:50
money why is that happening that way
14:52
then you got a couple days before this
14:55
bombshell story on Facebook and how it
14:59
totally looked the other way as the
15:01
Russians were waging cyber war on this
15:03
country to basically protect itself from
15:05
government scrutiny then you got the
15:07
story of Amazon running a The Bachelor
15:09
contest on American cities getting you
15:12
know a tax break for the world’s richest
15:14
man you know then you go back and we
15:16
just have the 10-year anniversary of the
15:18
financial crisis and basically now 10
15:20
years later it turns out the only people
15:22
who are fully recovered from it other
15:24
people who caused that and on and on and
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on and on these are all connected and I
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think we are not who we think
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we are in this country and we are living
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in an America that is the opposite of
15:38
our self-image if you ask if you stop at
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any red state blue state small town big
15:44
city farmstand and you say what are your
15:48
kind of central ideas of what this
15:49
country is about one of things that come
15:51
up very fast in my experience is
15:53
American dream like whatever effort you
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put in that’s where you end up this is
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actually leat less true in America than
16:03
in any other rich country the thing we
16:05
think is our thing is like the opposite
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of our thing ours is actually the most
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cast we are the kind of most cast
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Society among the rich countries and by
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the way the reduction of funding for our
16:22
public universities like University of
16:25
Michigan where you went to school where
16:27
I grew up around or Cal Berkeley they’ve
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ceased to be vehicles of upward mobility
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and according to Raj Chetty study with a
16:37
number of colleagues the University of
16:41
Michigan now has more people from the
16:42
top one percent then from the bottom
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sixty combined as undergraduates and
16:48
that’s 40,000 students that’s not some
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boutique College picking off trust fund
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kids that’s how they got to sustain
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themselves out of the hole like you said
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the mask is like all occluding our
17:02
vision of what’s really happening you
17:04
know sometimes you can have like a very
17:06
bad disease that remains invisible in
17:11
your body right there’s cancers that you
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people have for years without realizing
17:15
they have cancer and then and then it’s
17:18
too late I think we’ve had a cancer for
17:20
a while in terms of the veneration of
17:23
wealth thinking that people are smart
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just because they’re rich thinking they
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know what our school should be like just
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because they made money in hedge funds
17:29
thinking that they you know have insight
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into how we should fight diseases just
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because you know they made a soft drink
17:34
company and cause diseases and that
17:39
cancer has been in our society for a
17:42
while and it was pretty much undetected
17:44
people weren’t critiquing these things
17:46
Mark Zuckerberg a few years ago
17:48
announced I’m giving 99% of my wealth
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away I mean every newspaper story was
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this like puffy like gauzy philanthropy
17:56
thing I think Trump is the moment where
18:00
we realize we have cancer and I
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appreciate him for that
I appreciate the
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way in which he is flamboyantly made
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visible many of the ugliest tendencies
18:14
of our society he is the incarnation of
18:18
so much of what is bad in a culture
that
18:22
Revere’s money and he has tased Rama
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ties so many of the things I write about
18:28
in this book the the notion that the
18:31
people who caused our problems are best
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equipped to solve them somehow
18:34
the notion that you can kind of seek to
18:37
enrich yourself and sort of fight for
18:38
the common man at the same time when
18:40
when the notion that you can you know be
18:46
that just because you’re a
18:47
businessperson you have like you know
18:49
these special skills to solve any other
18:51
problem that have nothing to do with
18:53
your lane
well I think the the
18:57
sensibility you know we talk about new
18:59
economic thinking like it’s this model
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versus that model or whatever but you’re
19:05
penetrating to a different level which
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is what I would call the emotional
19:11
contours of who you want to be and who
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you allow to be the judging jury of the
19:18
meaning of your existence and by
19:20
understanding the context in which ideas
19:23
are formed and how they William are
19:26
called resonate with value it challenges
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us all to think about governance
19:38
media what matters to us
19:42
you’re really you’re opening up a lot of
19:45
structures that people who just played
19:47
my model versus your model never
19:50
considered and I think that that to me
19:53
that’s a very beautiful contribution
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that you’re making thank you
19:57
and will help us all go deeper Cornell
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west the famous theologian and scholar
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said to me one time we were on stage at
20:07
the Union Theological Seminary she said
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Robert sometimes you know you don’t
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understand what you have to do is get
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quiet and go deeper until you can come
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back yeah and I think the challenge that
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you mission in this book for all of the
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thinkers the intellectuals the scholars
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were the people who think that they have
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some kind of right to know a
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paternalistic design architecture for
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society I think you’re shaking us all up
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and I and I’m grateful to you for you
20:39
thank you so much

Dave Ramsey, Christian personal finance guru, defies COVID-19 to keep staff at desks

Christian personal finance advice celebrity Dave Ramsey, who plans a major, in-person staff Christmas party, sees wearing masks to prevent COVID-19 spread as a sign of fear rather than faith.

NASHVILLE (RNS) — Christian personal finance guru Dave Ramsey hopes his staff will spread peace and goodwill during the Christmas season.

They may also be spreading COVID-19.

Ramsey Solutions, the company founded by the bestselling author and radio host, plans to host “Boots & BBQ,” a large in-person Christmas party, for hundreds of staff members at the company’s Franklin, Tennessee, headquarters, despite an outbreak of more than 50 cases at the company’s headquarters as late as mid-November.

An invitation, sent to the company’s 800 staffers in a newsletter obtained by RNS, advises that no children are allowed at the Christmas bash and that employees are limited to one guest apiece. No mention is made of masks being required.

In staff meetings and on his radio show, Ramsey described masks and other COVID-19 prevention strategies as a sign of fear.

The Ramsey Solutions invitation to the 2020 Christmas Party. Submitted image

More than 2,500 people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in Tennessee, where more than 5,200 people have died of complications from the virus. There have been more than 428,000 cases of COVID-19 in the state.


RELATED: With vaccines on the horizon, faith leaders could play a crucial role in promoting their use


Ramsey Solutions does not require masks at its offices — Dave Ramsey himself has been a vocal opponent of mask-wearing and other COVID restrictions. In a clip from his daily radio show, posted on YouTube in November, Ramsey railed against what he called “totalitarian” government restrictions and mask mandates, saying he wanted to “start a crusade” against them.

The Dave Ramsey Show is known for its host’s folksy financial advice balanced with a moralizing disdain for debt. One of the show’s highlights is a listener’s call featuring a “debt-free scream” to mark their liberation from consumer debt using Ramsey’s methods.

Since March, Ramsey Solutions has had about 100 cases of COVID-19 among its employees, according to a recording of a mid-November staff call obtained by Religion News Service.

Among that number were about 50 cases in mid-November, Ramsey Solutions Executive Director of Human Resources Armando Lopez told staff on the Nov. 13 call.

“There are 50 people that are somewhere in the neighborhood who are either positive or returning to work,” Lopez said.

Ramsey Solutions did not respond to multiple requests for comment from Lopez or other leaders.

During the November call, Lopez acknowledged the entire country — including suburban Williamson County, where Ramsey Solutions is located — was seeing spiking COVID-19 numbers. “Williamson County has seen a huge increase in COVID cases. And so have we. Ramsey Solutions has seen a huge spike,” said Lopez.

The human resources director also said he feared the numbers were higher, admitting the company lacked an accurate system for tracking COVID-19 cases.

Despite the number of positive cases, Lopez told staff in November there were no plans to allow remote working. The company allowed staff to work from home during the initial weeks of the pandemic but has required them to return to company headquarters since May.

Lopez said Ramsey Solutions leadership had decided it was not “a work from home employer.”

Can we be a work from home employer for a short period of time?” he said on the Nov. 13 call. “We have proven for five weeks it works. Can we? Yes. Are we? No.”

Armando Lopez, Executive Director of Human Resources at Ramsey Solutions. Video screengrab via EntreLeadership

That message was repeated in a company newsletter sent on Nov. 20, which reported 32 positive cases among staff and another 17 staff awaiting tests. The newsletter encouraged staff to report any COVID-19 test results to human resources but maintained that the company would continue operating out of headquarters.

“We know that many of you have felt pressure from family and friends, some of whom think you are ‘weird’ for still going in to work,” said the newsletter.

“Fortunately we work in a place that is used to being called weird,” the newsletter continued, then highlighted Ramsey Solutions’ “countercultural approach to business.”

“And now we are weird for following common sense and using logic in providing for our families and our customers,” according to the newsletter.


RELATED: How Eric Metaxas went from Trump despiser to true believer


During the mid-November call with staff, Lopez said company leaders were not able to keep up with requests for exemptions to work from home, and employees were the best people to judge what is the right thing to do for their health. Some might decide they need to choose to quit their jobs, he said.

We know we are going to lose some people through this,” he said. “It is harsh and hard for me to say this.”

The company has advised workers to social distance if possible and to stay home if they feel sick. In staff newsletters, the company has encouraged testing for COVID-19 but has also shared articles claiming the threat of COVID-19 has been exaggerated by the media.

We are all adults here,” Luke Lefevre, a creative director at Ramsey, told employees in the Nov. 20 newsletter. “If you want to wear a mask, wear a mask. Give yourself healthy space from others. Use the stairs if you can. Don’t be careless.”

The company has also continued to hold large events during the pandemic, including its “EntreLeadership Summit” in July. That event was scheduled to be held at the Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida, near Orlando, but Ramsey moved the event to its Franklin offices after the Gaylord informed the company of significant COVID-19 restrictions, including mask checks, according to a lawsuit filed by Ramsey Solutions.

The summit was one of a series of “high-end experiences” put on by Ramsey, attracting thousands of business owners and other attendees, “each of whom spends between $5,000 and $15,000 to attend, inclusive of hotel,” according to the amended complaint in the suit.

The COVID-19 restrictions at the hotel, which included no buffets or other self-service food along with limited use of the pool or other amenities, made having the conference there untenable, Ramsey Solutions stated in the complaint.

In court documents, Ramsey Solutions claimed the change of venue cost the company $10 million in lost revenue.  

During a July staff meeting after the summit, Ramsey accused the hotel’s leadership of breaking their word to him and the company. The mask requirement in particular irked Ramsey. He ridiculed the idea that hotel staff would enforce a mask requirement on guests.

“As you guys are well aware we don’t require masks but if someone wants to wear a mask we don’t mind,” according to a recording of the meeting obtained by RNS. “Everybody gets to choose what you want to do. This is America — a voluntary thing, you choose what you want to do. But we’re not going to have someone pay $10,000 for a ticket to have some $8 an hour twerp at Marriott giving them a hard time about wearing a mask.”

At a staff meeting after Thanksgiving, Ramsey continued his criticism of those who are ruled by “fear” of COVID-19 and are “freaking out” due to the pandemic.

“They have got fear, they have trepidation on the COVID, they are scared to death about whether or not they are meeting all the social cues on fear and masks and temperature controls,” he said on a recording of the meeting obtained by RNS.

By contrast, he said, staff at Ramsey Solutions would spread Christmas cheer and joy during the holidays — as well as courage, which he said was contagious.

The company, Ramsey said, would not be ruled by fear.

“Fear is not a fruit of the spirit,” he told his employees in the meeting, while rallying them to step up their performance during the holiday season. “It is not on the list. And so, while sometimes I am afraid, I do not make decisions — and I do not let my behaviors be — dictated by fear unless it involves getting out of the way of a car that is coming toward me.”