5 Key Phrases to Disarm a Narcissist-Reclaim Your Control/Lisa A. Romano

Do you need some key phrases to disarm a narcissist? Do you freeze up when you are talking to a narcissist? Do you want to learn how to disarm a narcissist? Do you wish to regain your personal control?

Do you work with a narcissist that pushes your buttons? Do you have family a member that is always trying to gaslight you or step over your boundaries?

Narcissists like to take power over others. They are bullies and use dominant behavior against those they are wishing to control.

This video will help you maintain your power by learning some key phrases that allow you to hold onto yourself when there are those you know who are trying to manipulate and control you.

1) I am sorry you feel that way.
2) I can accept your faulty perception of me.
3)I have no right to control how you see me.
4) I guess I have to accept how you feel.
5) Your anger is NOT my responsibility.

These key phrases can help you disarm an intellectual narcissist and or anyone who keeps trying to bully you into believing that you should cater to the emotional needs of a narcissistic person.

Children of narcissistic parents, who are now suffering from codependency symptoms, may be struggling to learn how to love themselves after narcissistic abuse. Narcissists tend to attract people pleasers, or codependent personalities. Because codependents are eager to please, because they seek outside validation, they are easy targets for narcissistic lovers, and friends.

It is not easy to learn how to love yourself after narcissistic abuse, but with the right codependency recovery tools, it is possible. It is even possible to find love after codependency.

Richard Rohr Meditation: Unity in Differentiation

True union . . . doesn’t turn its respective participants into a blob, a drop dissolving into the ocean. Rather, it presses them mightily to become more and more themselves: to discover, trust, and fully inhabit their own depths. As these depths open, so does their capacity to love, to give-and-receive of themselves. . . .

The term “codependency” was not yet current in Teilhard’s day, but he already had the gist of it intuitively. He knew that love is not well served by collapsing into one another. It is better served by standing one’s own ground within a flexible unity so that more, deeper, richer facets of personhood can glow forth in “a paroxysm of harmonised complexity.” [1]