Why do people have such divergent perspectives on the Mueller Report, ranging from Trump being completely exonerated to Trump being guilty of obstruction of justice and impeachable?

Bob Sacamano
Bob Sacamano, studied Useless Information. at School of Hard Knocks
I believe that I have an example that may answer this. After Barr released the redacted Mueller report, I watched the first half of the Rachel Maddow show on MSNBC and later the first half of the Hannity show on Fox.

Maddow is biased, I have no disagreement about that but the coverage she gave was completely different from Hannity. Maddow took direct quotes from the report and discussed it with her guests. She easily discussed over ten direct quotes from the report in less than half an hour. She may have taken some quotes out of context, I have not read the report yet. Obviously she also chose quotes that would reinforce her narrative. Just remember, I am not claiming that Maddow is not biased.

Hannity spent the vast majority of the first half of his show ranting about Obama, Mueller, Hillary, Loretta Lynch, the deep state, Democrats in general, etc. After about twenty minutes Hannity finally took a direct quote from the report. A quote from Trump. Hannity then went back to ranting about all the people previously mentioned. Maybe he took more direct quotes later, I can only watch so much Hannity before I vomit.

So, Hannity claims that Trump is exonerated but he cited nothing from the report to back this up. Maddow tried to back up everything she said with a direct quote from the report. The reason why people have different perspectives is because of where they get their news. Liberals may watch biased news but at least they try to back it up with facts. Many conservatives get their news from propagandists. Sadly it appears as if many conservatives don’t know propaganda when they see it.

I should probably add this. In the thirty minutes I watched, Maddow asked her viewers to read the Mueller report for themselves several times. Hannity did not ask his viewers to read the Mueller report once in the thirty minutes I watched.

Friendship and the Democratic Process: Kwame Anthony Appiah (Onbeing)

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah offers hope for quiet, sustained culture shift through the “endless shared conversation” of friendship. The writer of the New York Times “Ethicist” column studies how deep social change happens across time and cultures. “If you have that background of relationship between individuals and communities that is conversational, then when you have to talk about the things that do divide you, you have a better platform.”

If you have that background of relationship between individuals and communities that is, in that sense, conversational, then when you have to talk about the things that do divide you, you have a better platform. You can begin with the assumption that you like and respect each other even though you don’t agree about everything, and you can maybe build on that. And you can know that, at the end of the conversation, it’s quite likely that you’ll both think something pretty close to what you both thought at the start. But people who’ve been heard and whose position is understood — this is one of the great virtues of democracy when it’s working — tend to be more willing to accept an outcome that they wouldn’t have chosen because they feel they’ve had voice; they’ve participated in the process.

Crafty Egyptian Law Helped Library of Alexandria

James Burke Connections, Ep. 2 “Death in the Morning”

now
06:40
they got these Scrolls either because
06:42
the local scholars wrote them or because
06:44
they had a rather crafty law see if you
06:46
came to Alexandria on a boat and you
06:48
owned a book you had to lend it to the
06:50
library to be copied

Tucker Carlson Mis-Quotes Robert Putnum (Cherry Picked Quotes)

At Politicon, Tucker Carlson cited:

2007 Robert Putnam:

Ethnic diversity is increasing in most advanced countries, driven mostly by sharp increases in immigration. In the long run immigration and diversity are likely to have important cultural, economic, fiscal, and developmental benefits. In the short run, however, immigration and ethnic diversity tend to reduce social solidarity and social capital. New evidence from the US suggests that in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods residents of all races tend to ‘hunker down’. Trust (even of one’s own race) is lower, altruism and community cooperation rarer, friends fewer. In the long run, however, successful immigrant societies have overcome such fragmentation by creating new, cross‐cutting forms of social solidarity and more encompassing identities. Illustrations of becoming comfortable with diversity are drawn from the US military, religious institutions, and earlier waves of American immigration.