Joe Rogan SLAMS Masvidal for Sucker Punching Colby Covington!

 

Any real dad would laugh at being called a deadbeat. It’s literally only an insult if it’s true. Like literally no good dad on the planet would see that as an attack on his family… Unless it’s true.

 

Calling Jorge a deadbeat dad is NOT attacking someone’s kids. It’s his lame excuse to sneak attack Colby. He had 5 rounds to defend his ego and he got beat down. Jorge is sore loser, End of story dude.
Colby never talked about his kids he was defensive towards them because he said Jorge was a dead beat dad
Colby talking shit made more people care about the fight, meaning more PPV sales, meaning more money for Masvidal who was getting points. He should be thanking Colby and sending him a fruit basket for carrying that PPV.
Waiting outside a steak restaurant to sucker punch someone who called you a “deadbeat dad”… … is exactly what a deadbeat dad would do.
He wanted to inflict pain to Colby and the only way he could do that was when he’s not ready
Never acceptable to sucker punch someone! There’s only one reason to cheap shot someone… because he knows he can’t beat him straight up. He knows first punch wins.. kinda makes ya wonder how many times he’s done this 🤔
Colby was standing up for Jorgies wife and kids. That should be commended. If more men stood up, like Colby did, there would be a lot less bad father out there in the world. But a lot of you think that its wrong to call dudes out for being bad fathers and husband. Supposed “Guy Code”, give me a break, if anybody thinks that’s right your part of the problem. And if you are one of those guys its because you are afraid your going to get called out and so you don’t think its right to do.
As a dad, you can call me a dead beat dad all day, I’m gonna laugh at you. He must be a dead beat if someone saying it upsets him.
Jorge had his chance, but he lost. Even if he was going to go after Colby he should have done it to his face by calling him out in the street or whatever angry buffoons do. Colby could have fought him or chose not to but you don’t assault a guy with a mask and a hood.
Finally had Josh back on the podcast and he comes with every bad take lmao. You’re going to bite someone’s flesh and think he’s not going to make money off you buy suing??? What if Jorge was actually as good as sucker punching as he told Ariel he was back in the day? Colby gets seriously hurt and Jorge is locked up when Colby never said anything directly about his kids. I’ve seen people saying Jorge is justified because it “disrupts his family life”. Yes, his family directly involved with him being a bad father but I don’t think that type shit talking is off limits especially when Jorge said he was going to end Askren’s ability to reproduce.
Colby literally ended masvidal’s career
I remember when Masvidal was the guy that everyone was on his coat tails and would go hard for him now 90% of the comments in any post is bashing him. He done it to his self and now people can’t stand him. We all know it wasn’t about his kids bc Colby never said a word about them he said he was a shit dad
Words are not assault – especially when they are hyping a fight! Action/assault on the street is breaking a law – period!
You know what I think is hilarious. Jorge would have still done this weather Covington mentioned anything about his family or not. Jorge could just not stand the fact Covington beat the living crap out of him for 25 minutes and then was hanging out in Miami with the nelkboys. Jorge was just being a crybaby because that was not him hanging out with them
Joe Rogan I usually love your opinion but when a fight happens in the streets people don’t usually warn a person before they hit them your stupid if you expect a pissed off offended man to be polite!!! I grew up with ” what do you call a dirty fighter? A winner!” Now I refuse to fight dirty because overcoming without compromising yourself is what makes a man!!!
Colby was told once before a fight “no matter what you do if you win or lose you’re being cut.” That was in Brazil and that’s when he started his character. Oh Joe told the story.
The irony is Masvidal had the opportunity to get his respect and failed.
Can you imagine if Jorge would have hit Colby and he fell head first on to the concrete? Could have easily been a homicide. Then add the dude that set him up. Then it becomes a conspiracy that led to manslaughter. Jail for all involved.
I remember admiring masvidal in 2018 & 2019. In 2022? He’s become an embarrassment & bad example of a human being both professionally & beyond
Everyone was on Masvidal’s side after the fight even though he lost. And now no one is defending him other than simps. He royally f-ed up. This will hurt his future fights and earnings.

Trump Should Be Removed from Office

It’s time to say what we said 20 years ago when a president’s character was revealed for what it was.

In our founding documents, Billy Graham explains that Christianity Today will help evangelical Christians interpret the news in a manner that reflects their faith. The impeachment of Donald Trump is a significant event in the story of our republic. It requires comment.

The typical CT approach is to stay above the fray and allow Christians with different political convictions to make their arguments in the public square, to encourage all to pursue justice according to their convictions and treat their political opposition as charitably as possible. We want CT to be a place that welcomes Christians from across the political spectrum, and reminds everyone that politics is not the end and purpose of our being. We take pride in the fact, for instance, that politics does not dominate our homepage.

That said, we do feel it necessary from time to time to make our own opinions on political matters clear—always, as Graham encouraged us, doing so with both conviction and love. We love and pray for our president, as we love and pray for leaders (as well as ordinary citizens) on both sides of the political aisle.

Let’s grant this to the president: The Democrats have had it out for him from day one, and therefore nearly everything they do is under a cloud of partisan suspicion. This has led many to suspect not only motives but facts in these recent impeachment hearings. And, no, Mr. Trump did not have a serious opportunity to offer his side of the story in the House hearings on impeachment.

But the facts in this instance are unambiguous: The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents. That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.

The reason many are not shocked about this is that this president has dumbed down the idea of morality in his administration. He has hired and fired a number of people who are now convicted criminals. He himself has admitted to immoral actions in business and his relationship with women, about which he remains proud. His Twitter feed alone—with its habitual string of mischaracterizations, lies, and slanders—is a near perfect example of a human being who is morally lost and confused.

Trump’s evangelical supporters have pointed to his Supreme Court nominees, his defense of religious liberty, and his stewardship of the economy, among other things, as achievements that justify their support of the president. We believe the impeachment hearings have made it absolutely clear, in a way the Mueller investigation did not, that President Trump has abused his authority for personal gain and betrayed his constitutional oath. The impeachment hearings have illuminated the president’s moral deficiencies for all to see. This

  • damages the institution of the presidency,
  • damages the reputation of our country, and
  • damages both the spirit and the future of our people. None of the president’s positives can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character.

This concern for the character of our national leader is not new in CT. In 1998, we wrote this:

The President’s failure to tell the truth—even when cornered—rips at the fabric of the nation. This is not a private affair. For above all, social intercourse is built on a presumption of trust: trust that the milk your grocer sells you is wholesome and pure; trust that the money you put in your bank can be taken out of the bank; trust that your babysitter, firefighters, clergy, and ambulance drivers will all do their best. And while politicians are notorious for breaking campaign promises, while in office they have a fundamental obligation to uphold our trust in them and to live by the law.

And this:

Unsavory dealings and immoral acts by the President and those close to him have rendered this administration morally unable to lead.

Unfortunately, the words that we applied to Mr. Clinton 20 years ago apply almost perfectly to our current president. Whether Mr. Trump should be removed from office by the Senate or by popular vote next election—that is a matter of prudential judgment. That he should be removed, we believe, is not a matter of partisan loyalties but loyalty to the Creator of the Ten Commandments.

To the many evangelicals who continue to support Mr. Trump in spite of his blackened moral record, we might say this: Remember who you are and whom you serve. Consider how your justification of Mr. Trump influences your witness to your Lord and Savior. Consider what an unbelieving world will say if you continue to brush off Mr. Trump’s immoral words and behavior in the cause of political expediency. If we don’t reverse course now, will anyone take anything we say about justice and righteousness with any seriousness for decades to come? Can we say with a straight face that abortion is a great evil that cannot be tolerated and, with the same straight face, say that the bent and broken character of our nation’s leader doesn’t really matter in the end?

We have reserved judgment on Mr. Trump for years now. Some have criticized us for our reserve. But when it comes to condemning the behavior of another, patient charity must come first. So we have done our best to give evangelical Trump supporters their due, to try to understand their point of view, to see the prudential nature of so many political decisions they have made regarding Mr. Trump. To use an old cliché, it’s time to call a spade a spade, to say that no matter how many hands we win in this political poker game, we are playing with a stacked deck of gross immorality and ethical incompetence. And just when we think it’s time to push all our chips to the center of the table, that’s when the whole game will come crashing down. It will crash down on the reputation of evangelical religion and on the world’s understanding of the gospel. And it will come crashing down on a nation of men and women whose welfare is also our concern.

Enron: Making Money in the Financial World – Stock Market, Commodity Trading Scandal (2005)

Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room is a 2005 documentary film based on the best-selling 2003 book of the same name by Fortune reporters Bethany McLean and Peter Elkind, a study of one of the largest business scandals in American history. About the book:
McLean and Elkind are credited as writers of the film alongside the director, Alex Gibney. The film examines the 2001 collapse of the Enron Corporation, which resulted in criminal trials for several of the company’s top executives; it also shows the involvement of the Enron traders in the California electricity crisis. The film features interviews with McLean and Elkind, as well as former Enron executives and employees, stock analysts, reporters and the former Governor of California Gray Davis.
The film won the Independent Spirit Award for Best Documentary Feature and was nominated for Best Documentary Feature at the 78th Academy Awards in 2006. The film begins with a profile of Kenneth Lay, who founded Enron in 1985. Two years after its founding, the company becomes embroiled in scandal after two traders begin betting on the oil markets, resulting in suspiciously consistent profits. Enron’s CEO, Louis Borget, is also discovered to be diverting company money to offshore accounts. After auditors uncover their schemes, Lay encourages them to “keep making us millions”. However, the traders are fired after it is revealed that they gambled away Enron’s reserves, nearly destroying the company. After these facts are brought to light, Lay denies having any knowledge of wrongdoing. Lay hires new CEO Jeffrey Skilling, a visionary who joins Enron on the condition that they utilize mark-to-model accounting, allowing the company to book potential profits on certain projects immediately after the deals are signed…whether or not those projects turn out to be successful. This gives Enron the ability to subjectively give the appearance of being a profitable company even if it isn’t. Skilling imposes his Darwinian worldview on Enron by establishing a review committee that grades employees and annually fires the bottom fifteen percent. This creates a highly competitive and brutal working environment.
Skilling hires lieutenants who enforce his directives inside Enron, known as the “guys with spikes.” They include J. Clifford Baxter, an intelligent but manic-depressive executive; and Lou Pai, the CEO of Enron Energy Services, who is notorious for using shareholder money to feed his obsessive habit of visiting strip clubs. Pai abruptly resigns from EES with $250 million, soon after selling his stock. Despite the amount of money Pai has made, the divisions he formerly ran lost $1 billion, a fact covered up by Enron. Pai uses his money to buy a large ranch in Colorado, becoming the second-largest landowner in the state.
With its success in the bull market brought on by the dot-com bubble, Enron seeks to beguile stock market analysts by meeting their projections. Executives push up their stock prices and then cash in their multi-million dollar options. Enron also mounts a PR campaign to portray itself as profitable and stable, even though its worldwide operations are performing poorly. Elsewhere, Enron attempts to use broadband technology to deliver movies on demand, and “trade weather” like a commodity; both initiatives fail. However, using mark-to-model accounting, Enron records non-existent profits for these ventures.
Enron’s successes continue as it became one of the few Internet-related companies to survive the dot-com bubble burst in 2000, and is named as the “most admired” corporation by Fortune magazine for the sixth year running. However, Jim Chanos, an Enron investor, and Bethany McLean, a Fortune reporter, question irregularities about the company’s financial statements and stock value. Skilling responds by calling McLean “unethical”, and accusing Fortune of publishing her reporting to counteract a positive BusinessWeek piece on Enron. Three Enron executives, including CFO Andrew Fastow, meet with McLean and her Fortune editor to explain the company’s finances. Fastow creates a network of shell companies designed solely to do business with Enron, for the ostensible dual purposes of sending Enron money and hiding its increasing debt. However, Fastow has a vested financial stake in these ventures, using them to defraud Enron of tens of millions of dollars. Fastow also takes advantage of the greed of Wall Street investment banks, pressuring them into investing in his shell entities and, in effect, conduct business deals with himself.

Tony Schwartz: The Truth About Trump | Oxford Union Q&A

Announcing his candidacy for the Republican nomination back in June 2015, Donald Trump stated “We need a leader that wrote ‘The Art of the Deal’ “. Tony Schwartz was the ghostwriter of the book Trump calls ‘his proudest achievement’. Schwartz has been vocal about his regrets in working on the piece, but, having worked intimately with Trump, provides a fascinating perspective into the personality and idiosyncrasies of the Republican nominee

 

3 Distinctive Trump Traits:

  1. Utter disregard for the truth & lack of conscience
  2. Guided by immediate self interest
  3. Inability to admit he was wrong

Trump Strength:

  • Persevering. Aggressive in pursuit of Goals
  • Manipulating the Media to get Attention

 

Making Sense of the New American Right

Keeping track of the Jacksonians, Reformicons, Paleos, and Post-liberals.

I like to start my classes on conservative intellectual history by distinguishing between three groups. There is the Republican party, with its millions of adherents and spectrum of opinion from very conservative, somewhat conservative, moderate, and yes, liberal. There is the conservative movement, the constellation of single-issue nonprofits that sprung up in the 1970s

  • gun rights,
  • pro-life,
  • taxpayer,
  • right to work

— and continue to influence elected officials. Finally, there is the conservative intellectual movement: writers, scholars, and wonks whose journalistic and political work deals mainly with ideas and, if we’re lucky, their translation into public policy.

David Brooks: Trump Hates Interpersonal Conflict

David Brooks: I spoke to a friend of Trump’s a couple months ago and he said you have to remember this guy hates conflict

He’ll do it over Twitter.  He’ll never do it face to face.

And so he’s there in North Korea.  He didn’t want to offend anyone in the room with him.

He’ll kiss up to anyone in the room and then tweet at them behind their back.

Mark Shields: He kisses up but he kicks down. That’s the lack of character of the man.