Trump Appoints Social Conservative To HHS Civil Rights Office And Heads Explode

He is a defender of religious liberty. He believes there are only two sexes. Both of which make him anathema to “public health” professionals who generally believe religion is fine as long as you don’t practice it and that any sexual perversion should be honored. Of particular concern is the effort by HHS to impose upon the US healthcare system the same view of this “transgender” nonsense that Department of Education tried to impose upon our education system.

.. HHS has focused on bullying all doctors and hospitals into treating transgender individuals as sane and requiring those institutions to do whatever surgical mutilation is necessary to help them live out their delusions. One such case is in the courts right now that would force a Catholic hospital to perform “gender reassignment surgery.”

.. Transgender fanatics are terrified that Severino will pull the plug on this fraud:
.. This is a situation where conservatives, regardless of their feelings about Trump, should be cheering. I can’t imagine a President Rubio making an in-your-face appointment like this. I can barely imagine a President Cruz making it. But these sub-cabinet appointments are critical to stopping the progressive agenda before it becomes embedded in the law. But, unfortunately, hate for Trump takes priority over everything else. Because to admit Severino is an excellent choice requires one to admit that Tom Price is an excellent choice. And that requires one to admit that Donald Trump is not a one-dimensional buffoon surrounded by Russian agents, which is something a lot of self-described conservatives cannot do without destroying their own worldview.

‘To Walk Invisible: The Brontë Sisters’ Review: Survival Instincts and Literary Ambitions

The hard-won triumphs of the Brontës are the subject of a new Masterpiece drama.

it is the struggle to survive, not literary ambition—though that ambition is a strong one—that takes precedence in the lives of these sisters.
.. father distinctly more concerned with his only son, Branwell (Adam Nagaitis) than with the doings of his dutiful daughters.
.. Their ultimate triumph arrives with the emergence of their actual identities after writing wildly successful works, all under male-sounding pseudonyms.
.. Charlotte gave when asked why she liked to write anonymously. If offered one gift by a good fairy it would be, “Grant me the power to walk invisible.”

‘Is that not correct?’: Male GOP lawmaker asks why men should pay for prenatal coverage

The law also required plans to cover pregnancy and childbirth. That’s where the fireworks started in the Energy and Commerce Committee.

“What mandate in the Obamacare bill does he take issue with?” Doyle asked Shimkus, using the formal parlance of congressional committees.

“What about men having to purchase prenatal care?” Shimkus said.

At that point, one could hear the room start to stir.

“I’m just . . . is that not correct?” Shimkus said. “And should they?”

 

.. “Do men not have to buy maternity coverage?” Ellmers said, referring to the health-care law’s essential health benefits. “To the best of your knowledge, has a man ever delivered a baby?”

Here’s how insurance expert and columnist Nancy Metcalf answered a similar question from a Consumer Reports reader that year:

Health insurance, like all insurance, works by pooling risks. The healthy subsidize the sick, who could be somebody else this year and you next year. Those risks include any kind of health care a person might need from birth to death — prenatal care through hospice. No individual is likely to need all of it, but we will all need some of it eventually.

Women in Power: Novel Herland

In 1915 Charlotte Perkins Gilman published a funny but unsettling story called Herland. As the title hints, it’s a fantasy about a nation of women – and women only – that has existed for two thousand years in some remote, still unexplored part of the globe. A magnificent utopia: clean and tidy, collaborative, peaceful (even the cats have stopped killing the birds), brilliantly organised in everything from its sustainable agriculture and delicious food to its social services and education. And it all depends on one miraculous innovation. At the very beginning of its history, the founding mothers had somehow perfected the technique of parthenogenesis. The practical details are a bit unclear, but the women somehow just gave birth to baby girls, with no intervention from men at all. There was no sex in Herland.