Donald Trump Promises to Dominate Jesus Christ

Donald Trump thanks Wendy’s for their donation and then says he would beat up Jesus if he got in his way.

Transcript

00:00
so no thank you were very happy with the
00:03
donation from Wendy’s okay and you know
00:06
it’s it’s a nice thing because I tell
00:09
you Wendy was not so hot okay they
00:11
wouldn’t use a cartoon of her if she was
00:13
if she was like a hot redhead okay like
00:15
you know the one from Mad Men that’s a
00:17
great that’s a little thick for me but
00:20
you know that’s that’s a redhead if
00:23
Wendy looked like her it was Joan you
00:27
think they’d be using the cartoon now
00:29
they’d be putting like her breasts as
00:31
the logo for the show but instead Wendy
00:34
you know but we take the money we
00:35
appreciate even though Wendy was not so
00:37
hot and but I’m having a great time with
the evangelicals they’re great great
people they I think that I think they
liked it when I had deer gassed
everybody away from the church so I
could stand and hold a Bible I don’t
think the evangelicals who support me I
don’t even think they’d like Jesus if he
was here first of all he’s like Middle
Eastern so broadly a terrorist and he’d
be talking love and peace and all this
very weak ok very weak person let me
tell you something if Jesus was in front
of that church last night I would have
punched him right in the face I mean I
would have really you know I would have
sent a strong message you got to
dominate when a guy when the Brent’s off
base and that’s what they call him I
don’t think he’s dead he’s I mean he was
no real Prince but but we love Him we
love you know Jesus
bla bla bla but I got to tell you when
he was no Prince it was a very weak guy
and you send a strong message if a guy
tries to step in front he and he goes
himself the Prince of Peace or the king
of the Jews which we all know is Bibi
Netanyahu great guy
that’s a tough that’s a that’s a Jewish
person that can lead but if you punch
Jesus right in the face in front of all
those protesters they know you mean
business you got to dominate when a
peaceful Son of God shows up you got to
dominate or else all of a sudden they’re
gonna follow him so I would have punched
Jesus right in the mouth but these
evangelicals they’re so stupid they are
the ones that support me anyway I think
they just won all the Old Testament
nastiness which I love but without any
other like niceness of the New Testament
so I think it’s great I think we do
very strong and we’re dominating and
it’s a good thing so we’ll see what
happens

Mary Trump once stood up to her uncle Donald. Now her book describes a ‘nightmare’ of family dysfunction.

Mary L. Trump was embroiled in a feud over her inheritance two decades ago when her uncle Donald Trump and his siblings punched back in classic style. In an obscure court filing, they belittled her, alleging she “lives primarily off the Trump income” and is “not gainfully employed.”

Actually, Mary Trump had embarked on a new career. She studied patients with schizophrenia at Hillside Hospital on Long Island for at least six months during this period, meeting with an array of people who were delusional, hallucinatory and suicidal.

Over time, she deepened her studies of the disorder, contributed to a book on treating schizophrenia, wrote a dissertation on stalkers, and became a clinical psychologist. But not since she became part of the lawsuit in 2000 against her uncle has she spoken in detail about what she sees as the disorders of Donald Trump.

Now her silence could be coming to an end. Her book about her uncle — “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man” — is slated to be published next month. The book is so potentially explosive that the Trump family is seeking to block publication, citing a confidentiality agreement that Mary Trump signed as part of a settlement about her inheritance. Mary Trump’s lawyer, Theodore Boutrous Jr., said the president is trying to “suppress a book that will discuss matters of utmost public importance.”

The publisher has not revealed specifics, and Mary Trump, 55, declined an interview request. But clues to her dark view of her uncle can be seen in lawsuits, and interviews with former colleagues and teachers, academic papers and a series of now-deleted tweets, including one that said her uncle’s election was the “worst night of my life.”

A description of the book from publisher Simon & Schuster suggests it will draw heavily on her studies of family dysfunction, with Mary using her clinical background to dissect “a nightmare of traumas, destructive relationships and a tragic combination of neglect and abuse,” including “the strange and harmful relationship between” her late father and Donald Trump.

The tragedy to which the book description alludes probably is informed by an event that infused both her life and that of her uncle: the death of her father — President Trump’s older brother Fred Jr. — of alcoholism when she was 16 years old.

Friends of her father’s told The Washington Post last year that they blame his death in part on the way he was treated by Donald Trump, and the president said in an interview last year with The Post that he regrets how he dealt with his brother.

President Trump told Axios that he didn’t think his niece was allowed to write the book because she signed the confidentiality agreement. The White House declined further comment.

Donald Trump’s brother Robert, who filed the petition to stop the book, said in the filing that Mary had agreed after accepting an unspecified financial settlement from the inheritance fight that she “would not publish any account” of her relationship with Donald Trump or his siblings. In a statement, Robert Trump said Mary’s decision to “mischaracterize our family relationship after all these years for her own financial gain is a travesty and injustice” to her late father, Fred Jr., and grandfather, Fred Sr., saying the family feels that “Mary’s actions are truly a disgrace.”

A Queens County Surrogate’s Court on Thursday denied the petition on grounds of lack of jurisdiction, but Robert Trump’s attorney said it would be refiled with the New York State Supreme Court.

Gilded life

From birth, Mary Trump was supposed to be set for a gilded life, a grandchild of Fred Sr. and Mary. Her father, Fred Jr., was the eldest of Fred Trump Sr.’s children, and he was expected to follow his father as the leader of the family business.

Mary was featured in society columns as a fashionably dressed young girl, and she spent time at her grandparents’ palatial home in Queens, watching her father feud with Donald and Fred Sr., who ran a New York City real estate company.

Much to the family’s consternation, Fred Jr. was interested in becoming a pilot for TWA, not in renting New York City apartments. After graduating from Lehigh University in 1960, he married a flight attendant named Linda Lee Clapp in 1962. He went to flight school and the couple had two children, including Mary, who was born in 1965.

Fred Jr. was already drinking heavily by the time Mary was born, and his troubles with alcohol may have caused him to give up his dream of becoming a commercial airline pilot, according to three former TWA employees who trained with him. Meanwhile, Donald Trump and Fred Sr. continued to pressure him to join the family business.

By the time Mary was 6 years old, her mother divorced Fred Jr. A family friend, David Miller, said in an interview that while Fred Jr.’s drinking played a role in the divorce, there was also a lot of pressure from Fred Sr., who Miller said disliked Linda. “She wasn’t welcomed into the family,” Miller said of Linda. Linda could not be reached for comment.

Fred Trump Sr. agreed at the time of the divorce to support Linda and his grandchildren, providing rent and $100 per week for expenses, plus $25 per week for Mary and Fred III, according to court records. Fred Sr. agreed to pay for Mary to attend a private school during her early years as well as her college and medical expenses.

On Sept. 26, 1981, Fred Trump Jr. died at 42 years old of a heart attack, which the family has said stemmed from alcoholism. Mary was 16 years old.

Carried a burden

Mary eventually attended Tufts University, where she studied the Southern novelist William Faulkner. In a seminar with English professor Alan Lebowitz, Mary and her 15 or so fellow students analyzed the Compson family portrayed in novels such as “The Sound and the Fury.

The Compsons bore some similarities to her own family: Like the Trumps, the Compsons migrated to the United States from Scotland, and the family was riven by dysfunction. At the time, Donald Trump was running his Atlantic City casinos, which went into bankruptcy, and preparing to divorce his first wife, Ivana, and marry Marla Maples.

Lebowitz said in a telephone interview that he has rarely had a student as exceptional as Mary Trump, who was featured in the Tufts commencement program as having won the award for top English student.

She was just as smart and accomplished as any I’ve taught in 40 years,” Lebowitz said. “She took a seminar on William Faulkner with me and she wrote two absolutely stunning papers, long, deep and elegant. We studied an enormously complex, interesting writer and she got deeply into it because she is a deep thinker.”

Lebowitz, who is retired, recalled that when she entered his classroom more than 30 years ago, he learned of the weight she carried.

“I knew that her father had been a very sad story and that she was carrying the burden of that story,” he said.

Mary and her brother Fred III had received some financial support over the years from the Trump family, and they expected to receive a significant inheritance from their grandfather, Fred Sr., who died in 1999. Mary and her brother had hoped they would get an amount close to what would have gone to their father, if he had lived, but they learned they were due to receive a lesser amount, and a probate fight ensued, court records show.

Mary and Fred III alleged that an unnamed person associated with the Trump family improperly engineered a change in the will of their grandfather, who had Alzheimer’s disease during his last years. Mary and her brother said the changes in the will were “procured by fraud and undue influence.”

Donald said at the time that he supported a cutoff of medical coverage that had been provided by a family company for Fred III’s son, William, who had cerebral palsy. Donald Trump told the New York Daily News that when he and his siblings were sued by Fred III and Mary, he felt, “Why should we give [William] medical coverage?”

Donald’s brother Robert said in a deposition that the family had given Mary annual gifts of $20,000, in addition to income from family ventures, estimating that Mary and Fred III annually received “close to $200,000 without either one lifting a finger at any time.”

Mary was livid about the family’s decision to cut off medical coverage for her nephew William. She told the Daily News at the time, “Given this family, it would be utterly naive to say it has nothing to do with money. But for both me and my brother, it has much more to do with that our father be recognized. He existed, he lived, he was their oldest son. And William is my father’s grandson. He is as much a part of that family as anybody else. He desperately needs extra care.”

In the 2000 lawsuit, Mary did not directly address her uncle Robert’s assertion that she was “not gainfully employed.” But it was around this time, after working on a master’s degree in English at Columbia University, that she served in a voluntary role in the study of schizophrenia patients, assisting senior social worker Rachel Miller at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y.

Miller said Mary Trump showed an intense interest in understanding what drove people into psychological dysfunction. “She went into a situation that is hard to see. Many doctors and social workers couldn’t go there, it was so frightening to see somebody losing their mind,” Miller said.

Mary Trump accompanied her in visits with patients who were typically 16 to 25 years old and experiencing their first episodes of schizophrenia. “She had her life set on doing what she wanted to do, which was to be a psychologist,” Miller said.

Later, when Miller needed help on a book she co-wrote, “Diagnosis: Schizophrenia,” about the study, she said Mary worked long hours to help her research and write the manual, which became popular in the field and with families of people with the disease.

‘Worst night of my life’

Mary Trump continued her studies at Adelphi University, where she earned a master’s degree in psychology in 2001, a master’s in clinical psychology in 2003, and a doctoral degree in clinical psychology in 2010, a school official said.

In her 205-page dissertation, “A Characterological Evaluation of the Victims of Stalking,” she examined whether there were certain personality characteristics that made some people “more vulnerable to being victims of stalking by an intimate partner.”

A few years later, Mary founded a company called Trump Coaching Group, which provided wellness and fitness services on Long Island.

An archived version of the now-deleted company website said the company focused on nurturing relationships. It said Mary’s interest stemmed “from her own struggles as an athlete with asthma which have given her a true appreciation for the extent to which physical well-being is vital to psychological and emotional well-being.”

One of the coaches listed as a team member said the company didn’t develop much beyond the creation of the website. Paige Crosby, who said she participated in a year-long training program with Mary Trump to become a life coach, recalled her talking about her “hurt feelings” from her “sour relationship” with Donald.

As Donald Trump announced his candidacy in 2015, Mary Trump does not appear to have said anything publicly about him.

But when it became clear that her uncle had won the presidency, she took to Twitter. “Worst night of my life,” she wrote at least 12 times in tweets that have been deleted recently. She wrote that “We should be judged harshly. . . . I grieve for our country.”

Mary Trump’s publicist, asked to verify that Mary wrote the tweets, declined to comment.

Last year, according to corporate filings, Mary created a company that echoed the name of the tragic family in Faulkner’s novels: Compson Enterprises. In an initial listing for her book, designed to keep the project a secret, her name was given as Mary Compson.

Now Mary Trump appears to hope that, with an assist from the publication of her book, the next presidential election will turn out differently from the last. She foreshadowed it at 4:07 a.m. on Nov. 9, 2016, shortly after her uncle was declared the president-elect, when she tweeted simply: “2020.”

Has Trump Decided We Will Follow Sweden and Just Not Told Us?

The president brings instability and confusion to a crisis.

Having a pandemic is really bad. Having a pandemic and a civil war together is really, really bad. Welcome to Donald Trump’s America 2020.

If you feel dizzy from watching Trump signal left — issuing guidelines for how states should properly emerge from pandemic lockdowns — while turning right — urging people to liberate their states from lockdowns, ignore his own guidelines and even dispute the value of testing — you’re not alone.

Since Trump’s pronouncements are simultaneously convoluted, contradictory and dishonest, here’s my guess at what he is saying:

“The Greatest Generation preserved American liberty and capitalism by taking Omaha Beach in Normandy on D-Day — in the face of a barrage of Nazi shelling that could and did kill many of them. I am calling on our generation to preserve American liberty and capitalism today by going shopping in the malls of Omaha, Nebraska, in the face of a coronavirus pandemic that will likely only kill 1 percent of you, if you do get infected. So be brave — get back to work and take back your old life.”

Yes, if you total up all of Trump’s recent words and deeds, he is saying to the American people: between the two basic models for dealing with the pandemic in the world — China’s rigorous top-down, test, track, trace and quarantine model — while waiting for a vaccine to provide herd immunity — and Sweden’s more bottom up, protect-the-most-vulnerable-and-let-the-rest-get-back-to-work-and-get-the-infection-and-develop-natural-herd-immunity model, your president has decided for Sweden’s approach.

He just hasn’t told the country or his coronavirus task force or maybe even himself.

But this is the only conclusion you can draw from all the ways Trump has backed off from his own government guidelines and backed up his end-the-lockdown followers, who, like most of the country, have grown both weary of the guidelines and desperate to get back to work and paychecks.

But, in keeping with my D-Day analogy, Trump has basically decided to dispatch Americans into this battle against this coronavirus without the equivalent of maps, armor, helmets, guns or any coordinated strategy to minimize their casualty count. He’s also dispatching them without national leadership — so it’s every platoon, or state, for themselves, maximizing the chances of virus spread between people who want to go shopping and those who still want to shelter in place.

He’s also dispatching them without a national plan to protect the most vulnerable, particularly the elderly, and without setting the example that everyone should wear face masks and practice social distancing whenever they are at work or in a public setting. Finally, he’s dispatching them without a plan of retreat if way too many vulnerable people are infected and harmed as we take to the malls of Omaha and beyond.

Other than all that, Trump is just like F.D.R.

I fear that when these shortcomings become apparent, it could trigger a low-grade civil war between those who will ask their neighbors: “Who gave you the right to ignore the guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and heedlessly go to a bar, work or restaurant and then spread coronavirus to someone’s grandparents or your own?” And those who will ask their neighbors: “Who gave you the right to keep the economy closed in a pandemic and trigger mass unemployment, which could cost many more lives than are saved, especially when alternative strategies, like Sweden’s, might work?”

A new Mason-Dixon line could emerge between those states led by governors who want to equip their people with the maximum protective gear and safety guidelines and those governors who are keen to reopen their states for business as usual — gear and guidelines be damned.

According to a new poll from Pew Research Center, more than two-thirds of Americans worry that their respective states are reopening too quickly, while pro-Trump protesters have taken to the streets to demand that businesses get people back to work now.

So, I can imagine the possibility of the governor of Maryland, who has been very careful about lifting lockdowns, banning cars coming north on Interstate 95 with Georgia license plates. And this is not just my imagination.

South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem “sent letters Friday to the leaders of both the Oglala Sioux Tribe and the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe demanding that checkpoints designed to prevent the spread of coronavirus on tribal land be removed” — or risk legal action, CNN.com reported Saturday. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has rejected the ultimatum. Stay tuned.

The tragedy of all of this is that a better president would never have allowed us to get to this edge of pandemic civil strife.

A real president would be simultaneously framing the issues for the nation and then arguing for and guiding us on the least painful course. He’d start by explaining that we are up against a challenge no one in our generation has ever faced — the challenge of a global pandemic in which Mother Nature is silently, invisibly, exponentially and mercilessly spreading a coronavirus among us.

And, unlike a human foe, you can’t defeat Mother Nature, negotiate with her or spin her. All you can do is adapt in the least harmful way possible to whatever she throws at you. And when it’s a pandemic, it means there are only hellish moral and economic trade-offs — no matter which path you choose. Too closed, she’ll kill your jobs. Too open, she’ll kill your vulnerable.

The job of leadership is to choose the path that offers the most sustainable way to balance lives and livelihoods and then create and stick to the conditions that make it workable.

So, as I said, China has chosen the pathway of locking down and then opening its economy, but with strict social distancing, masks everywhere and highly intrusive testing, tracking, tracing and quarantining anyone with coronavirus to prevent further spread — while it waits for a vaccine to create herd immunity.

Sweden has chosen moderate social distancing, keeping a lot of its economy open, while trying to protect the most vulnerable and letting those least vulnerable — those most likely to experience coronavirus either asymptomatically or as a mild or tough flu — continue to work, get the virus and develop immunity to it. Then, when enough of them are immune, they can sound the all-clear for the vulnerable. That’s Sweden’s strategy, but it is too early to say it’s the right answer.

If you listened to Trump last week you heard a president who was all over the place. One day he talked as though he wanted to follow Sweden in getting a lot of people back to work, even if many more will get infected by coronavirus. Another day, he boasted that we’re testing just like China — only more so. Another day he disputed the need for testing at all.

In brief: Trump talks like China, envies Sweden, prepares for neither and insists that his strategy is superior to both.

But the fact is he is not prepared to impose the kind of strict surveillance tracing and quarantining system that makes China’s reopening work. And he is not ready to consider strategies — like moving vulnerable people living in crowded homes to empty hotels or surrounding every nursing home with a public health testing units — that might make a Swedish-style opening less dangerous.

So, I fear that we are heading for a roiling mess. Our coronavirus infections will be exacerbated by Trump’s incompetence, while our hyper-political partisanship will be fed by his malevolence. After all, his whole political strategy is to divide us into red and blue, Republicans and Democrats, open-now advocates and go-slow advocates. That’s the only politics he practices.

In sum, Covid-19 is sapping our economic and physical health, while Trump is undermining our institutions and national unity. We desperately need a vaccine — and a 2020 election outcome — that can give us herd immunity to this virus and this president.

GOP Governor Infects National Food Supply

GOP governor infects national food supply while threatening the lives of his citizens

“On Tuesday, March 31, an emergency room doctor at the main hospital in Grand Island, Nebraska, sent an urgent email to the regional health department: “Numerous patients” from the JBS beef packing plant had tested positive for COVID-19. The plant, he feared, was becoming a coronavirus “hot spot.”

The town’s medical clinics were also reporting a rapid increase in cases among JBS workers. The next day, Dr. Rebecca Steinke, a family medicine doctor at one of the clinics, wrote to the department’s director: “Our message is really that JBS should shut down for 2 weeks and have a solid screening plan before re-opening.”

Teresa Anderson, the regional health director, immediately drafted a letter to the governor.

But during a conference call that Sunday, Gov. Pete Ricketts made it clear that the plant, which produces nearly 1 billion pounds of beef a year and is the town’s largest employer, would not be shut down.”

State of Maryland protected Covid Tests with National Guard

00:07
we’re all thinking about our hands and
00:12
right now we’ll need them more than ever
00:16
America’s factories power plants
00:19
government military data transportation
00:24
water waste national security hospitals
00:29
are all fighting they need people on the
00:33
ground to keep them functioning which is
00:37
why we are working hands on around the
00:39
clock
00:40
supporting the larger efforts in every
00:42
state and county because our technology
00:45
is only as powerful as the people
00:47
deploying and maintaining it keeping
00:52
America moving takes more than
00:55
technology alone it takes a human touch
01:01
[Music]
01:12
[Music]
01:25
[Music]
01:28
we’re watching certain metrics and
01:31
looking at a pattern of numbers before
01:33
we make any kind of decisions everything
01:36
is going to be based on the numbers and
01:37
the science we’re not going to do
01:39
anything that’s that’s going to put
01:41
anybody in in more danger
01:44
[Music]
01:52
welcome to Washington Post live I’m Bob
01:54
Costas an a tional political reporter at
01:57
The Washington Post this morning we
01:59
continue our leadership during crisis
02:02
series as the corona virus pandemic up
02:05
ends all aspects of American life our
02:08
guest today is a state executive on the
02:11
frontlines Larry Hogan Maryland’s
02:13
Republican governor he is chairman of
02:15
the National Governors Association
02:18
governor Hogan welcome good morning Bob
02:20
thanks for having me
02:21
good morning so governor what is the
02:24
latest in Maryland in terms of cases and
02:27
the death toll well so we were still
02:31
kind of climbing that curve in Maryland
02:34
we were a couple of weeks behind some of
02:36
the other states because of some of the
02:37
early and aggressive action we took we
02:40
just surpassed 21,000 cases and sadly we
02:44
just went over a thousand deaths here in
02:46
the state but we’re we’re certainly in a
02:50
much better position than we would have
02:52
been we not taking aggressive action so
02:55
you’re in a much better position but are
02:57
you ready to set a date about reopening
02:59
your state so we laid out a very
03:02
detailed plan just last week and we’ve
03:05
had a coronavirus response team made up
03:08
of some of the smartest scientists and
03:11
epidemiologists and public health
03:13
officials in our state from places like
03:15
Johns Hopkins and some of the leaders of
03:17
this pandemic response really nationally
03:20
advising us we developed a plan that
03:23
took into consideration the president’s
03:26
own corrupt coronavirus plan the mga
03:28
plan that we put out the week before for
03:31
the recommendations for all the
03:33
governor’s along with some Hopkins
03:35
reopening plan and the American
03:37
Enterprise Institute plan put together
03:38
by dr. Scott Godley who was the former
03:42
FDA commissioner and our plan is as soon
03:45
as we see a flattening or a plateauing
03:47
of these key numbers like
03:49
hospitalizations and ICU bets or the
03:51
things that we’re really focused on the
03:54
number of cases is going to rise as we
03:56
do more testing and so and and sadly the
04:00
deaths lag a couple of weeks behind
04:02
what’s actually happening now and so the
04:05
numbers that
04:06
most closely following on a daily basis
04:08
our hospitalizations in ICU beds and
04:11
we’re not seeing as much of a spike
04:13
we’ve got a couple of days up a little
04:15
bit but it’s a it seems to be leveling
04:18
out which is a good sign it seems to be
04:21
leveling out so you’re still in a
04:22
wait-and-see period about those metrics
04:24
we’re looking at those metrics and we
04:28
wanted to make sure that we before kind
04:30
of key building blocks that we wanted to
04:32
have in place we want to make sure we
04:34
had robust testing which we have ramped
04:36
up dramatically we want to make sure we
04:38
can do contact tracing we have a enough
04:42
of a supply of PPE which has been a
04:45
difficult thing for most of the states
04:47
to deal with and we’re constantly
04:49
bringing in more and more supplies to
04:51
support our hospitals and and then you
04:54
know the last thing we’re dealing with
04:55
is hospital surge and we’ve added six
04:57
thousand beds to our hospital capacity
04:59
and have been acquiring ventilators to
05:01
make sure that we can be prepared so
05:04
those things in place we have a phased
05:06
plan to start implementing just as soon
05:10
as we can because we’re anxious to get
05:12
our economy back on track and put people
05:14
back to work but we want to make sure we
05:16
do so in a safe effective and gradual
05:19
way let’s talk about the supplies you
05:22
just mentioned last week it was big news
05:25
Marilyn bought 500,000 tests from South
05:28
Korea but you saw the Washington Post
05:31
this morning they have not been used yet
05:33
what’s the holdup well I announced when
05:36
we acquired the test a little over a
05:38
week ago it was a it was a huge
05:41
accomplishment it’s like this more than
05:43
a month after the president said the
05:46
states were kind of on their own and had
05:47
to go out and get their own testing we
05:49
searched all over the country to find
05:51
tests and we finally through some
05:53
international diplomacy we were able to
05:55
get this half a million tests in from
05:57
Korea at the time when that plane landed
06:00
that half a million tests was more than
06:02
the all of the testing added together
06:04
for four out of the top five states in
06:07
America it was quite a step but when I
06:09
announced it 10 days ago I said it was
06:11
still only a part of the puzzle because
06:13
we still needed swabs and reagents there
06:16
are about nine different steps in this
06:18
that was a big chunk of it the rest of
06:20
it we’re continuing to work on and prove
06:22
on but the story really wasn’t you know
06:24
I hate to take a shot at the Washington
06:26
Post but it really wasn’t that accurate
06:28
of a story because we are utilizing the
06:30
tests we have thousands of them that are
06:32
being deployed but we have to ramp up
06:34
our lab capacity which we’ve been
06:35
working with the federal government on
06:36
trying to get some assistance on there
06:38
had been a shortage of lab of swabs all
06:41
across the country which the president
06:43
just instituted the defense production
06:45
act on all of these things are part of
06:47
being able to deploy those half-million
06:49
tests but we have a poultry outbreak on
06:52
the Eastern Shore we have thousands of
06:53
those tests over there now and produce
06:55
stadium in Salisbury we’re putting them
06:57
out in our we put out a report yesterday
06:58
that we’re going to do mandatory testing
07:00
of every single patient in every single
07:02
nursing home first state in America in
07:04
America to do that and we’re doing that
07:06
with those Korean tests that we’re just
07:08
talking about to the point about the
07:10
Washington Post story I’ve heard from
07:12
Governor Pritzker of Illinois for
07:13
example a similar point that you just
07:15
made that it’s not just enough to have
07:17
the test you have to have the supplies
07:19
that go along with the test when are you
07:21
going to feel comfortable that Marilyn
07:23
has those supplies to use the tests you
07:25
got from South Korea well so we’re using
07:28
as many of them as we can and as the
07:30
additional supplies come in we’re
07:32
utilizing more of them but when we when
07:34
we acquired the test we said that was
07:36
helping us on a long-term strategy so we
07:38
always intended this to be over several
07:39
months that we would utilize those
07:42
half-million tests not in the first week
07:44
that we acquired them so but where it
07:46
all depends on the ability of to get the
07:49
swabs the reagents all of the steps in
07:52
the process and the lab capacity so you
07:54
know we’ve got private labs involved
07:55
that have to get it ramped up we’ve got
07:58
the University of Maryland where we
07:59
invested in robotics just so that they
08:01
can produce 20,000 tests per week which
08:04
is a major improvement we’ve been
08:07
getting reagents we were able to ramp up
08:09
I think you know 40,000 more tests as
08:12
about a week or so ago and swabs
08:14
continues to be a problem but it seems
08:16
like and that is something that the
08:17
federal government is helping with and
08:18
hopefully we’re gonna get more supplies
08:20
in but right now we’re using all we can
08:22
possibly use and we’re hoping to be able
08:24
to keep up with demand as we need them
you say the federal government you want
it to be a partner with Maryland
but based on my own reporting you had
some concerns about whether the feds
would cease these tests when you brought
them over from South Korea is that true
were you concerned that the federal
government would try to take those tests
out of your hands was a little bit of a
concern about trying to get these things
and it was a very complicated process
you know we we spent about 22 days and
nights dealing with this whole
transaction with Korea dealt with the
Korean embassy and folks at the State
Department in Korea eight different
state agencies and our scientists on
both sides trying to you know figure out
these tests and that at the last moment
I think 24 hours before we got sign-off
from the FDA and border and customs to
try to make sure that we landed this
plane safely we made sure it landed at
BWI Airport instead of Dulles so the
first time a Korean Air passenger plane
has ever landed at Baltimore Washington
International Airport we landed it there
with a large contingent of Maryland
National Guard and Maryland State Police
because this was an enormous ly valuable
payload it was like it was like Fort
Knox to us because gonna save the lives
of thousands of our citizens and there
had been reports of for example in
Massachusetts governor Charlie Baker
told the story of his plane load that
came in with with masks was basically
confiscated by the federal government

and he had to then get Robert Kraft the
owner of the Patriots to fly a second
mission with a private plane to try to
bring some of that equipment in for a
couple of other states that had similar
stories
so we were just making sure that
that was so important to us that we
wanted to make sure that that plane took
off from Korea safely landed here in
America safely and that we guarded that
cargo from whoever might interfere with
the US getting that to our folks that
needed it the national guard protecting
test is the National Guard in Maryland
still protecting those tests they are
the National Guard and the State Police
are both guarding these tests at an
undisclosed location these things are
being distributed they’re helping us
distribute the test they’re also helping
in all kinds of other humanitarian
we have about 1,300 members of the
Maryland National Guard who have been
activated another 800 that are kind of
on standby ready for activation within
an eight-hour period but they were just
tremendous they’re helping us distribute
supplies and PPE helping us with the
distribution of those tests they’re
helping provide meals for hungry kids I
mean they’ve just done an incredible job
and we were utilizing them these are
citizen soldiers that are really
stepping up to help their says there’s
fellow citizens in need are we seeing in
Maryland a racial disparity in access to
testing generally not access to testing
in fact we’re actually most of our tests
are deployed in our high population
areas which also happen to be more
racially diverse so we’re doing more
testing in the areas with higher
11:29
concentrations of minorities but we’re
11:31
also there is a disparity in I mean
11:33
there’s no question that that minorities
11:36
are more impact they didn’t have a
11:38
higher percentage of people that are
11:40
that are both getting the virus and
11:44
dying from the virus and so it has to do
11:46
with you know our population centers and
11:49
in in the inner Beltway and the
11:51
Washington suburbs and in Baltimore City
11:53
where we have highly dense populations
11:56
and people that are you know riding
11:57
public transportation or working and
12:00
living in closed environments and
12:01
there’s definitely there we published
12:04
all the racial data which does show that
12:07
that minorities are more impacted by the
12:11
virus but we’ve spent more time more
12:13
resources and done more testing and put
12:16
more of a focus on those areas than
12:17
anywhere else people in minority
12:20
communities people across Maryland
12:23
they’re also struggling not only with
12:24
access to testing but access to
12:26
unemployment benefits and you’ve
12:28
apologized acknowledged problems in that
12:30
effort the beacon portal so what are you
12:32
doing right now today to speed up access
12:35
to debit cards and checks well so this
12:39
has just been an enormous first of all
12:41
my heart goes out to all the people that
12:43
are struggling and suffering there’s so
12:45
many so much unemployment I think
12:46
nationally as of today you know 30
12:49
million people filing for unemployment
12:51
some of these benefits are brand-new
12:53
I want to thank the federal government
12:55
and Congress and everybody for moving so
12:57
quickly to add these additional benefits
12:59
folks that are not w-2 employees but gig
13:02
workers and 1099 none of the websites
13:05
could handle these types of these new
13:08
types of benefits number one and the
13:11
volume was so unprecedented we had in a
13:13
five-day period something like 250,000
13:18
people try to file which was more than
13:20
the entire year of 2019 we created a
13:23
brand-new website for this brand-new
13:25
program to try to handle that and we
13:28
were one of the first in the country to
13:29
do so in many places they aren’t even
13:31
able to provide the benefit so you can’t
13:33
get through on a phone a couple of
13:34
states their entire system crashed and
13:37
it’s been down for days ours has
13:39
continued to run and we’ve been able to
13:40
help a couple of hundred thousand people
13:42
but it’s frustrating to me that some
13:44
people were waiting way too long and the
13:46
system was not able to help handle the
13:48
speed so I you know I said look this
13:52
it’s unacceptable as the governor of the
13:54
state I you know I have higher standards
13:57
of that and I’ve been demanding from the
13:59
contractors that are developed aside
14:01
from our all of our state workers we’ve
14:03
brought in hundreds of people to try to
14:04
fix it working around the clock 24 hours
14:06
a day as of this morning it’s working
14:08
and functioning much better you have
14:11
about a three minute wait rather than
14:13
waiting for hours but we expect that
14:15
volume when people start filing if the
14:17
file every week so Sunday and Monday the
14:19
massive volumes are gonna come in again
14:21
we’re hoping it’s gonna work much better
14:22
but it’s a difficult every state in
14:24
America is having difficulties
14:26
processing the massive volume and we’re
14:28
trying to get people every penny of the
14:31
money that they deserve and that they
14:32
desperately need as quickly as we can
14:35
speaking of speed another tragedy in
14:38
your state in other states
14:40
nursing homes and you’ve now mandated
14:42
testing for residents staff at nursing
14:45
homes the question is though how soon
14:48
can that be done
14:50
so the nursing homes as you know if you
14:52
remember Bob when we first started
14:55
hearing about this in America was that
14:56
focus in Washington state of Washington
14:59
with that nursing home and I remember
15:01
vividly seeing those those images it’s
15:05
been probably the biggest problem that
15:08
every state has had nursing homes
15:10
because we have that’s our most
15:12
vulnerable population and they’re in
15:15
such a vulnerable position so what when
15:18
the the very first day of our crisis
15:19
they we got our first case in Maryland I
15:23
called in all of the long-term care
15:25
facility operators the nursing homes the
15:27
assisted living all of these folks and
15:29
weeks we brought them in we took really
15:32
aggressive action on day one to lay out
15:35
protocols we didn’t know we cut down
15:37
access so there were no visitors allowed
15:38
this was fifty fifty two days ago we we
15:42
said that staff had to be checked
15:44
temperature checks as they came and went
15:46
no travel for your staff but all kinds
15:49
of protocols we put in place together
15:51
with the industry in spite of all those
15:53
things a symptomatic staff who didn’t
15:58
have a temperature didn’t show any signs
15:59
of anything and there were no visitors
16:01
coming a symptomatic staff would would
16:04
come to work with the virus unknowingly
16:06
and it just went through these nursing
16:09
homes like wildfire we now have over
16:11
4,000 cases in our nursing homes we have
16:15
we have about 130 some nursing home
16:18
centers with outbreaks or clusters and
16:20
sadly 46 percent of all of our deaths
16:23
our nursing home patients so we’ve taken
16:25
further steps to now not wait until
16:28
somebody’s showing signs of symptoms and
16:33
and but we’re testing every single staff
16:36
member and every single patient in all
16:39
those there’s 24,000 of them in our
16:41
state so it takes a while to get it done
16:43
we’re prioritize just started yesterday
16:45
this new program we’re with our new
16:48
tests from Korea but we’re prioritizing
16:50
the ones where we have the outbreaks and
16:52
where we have threats of potential
16:54
clusters where we’ve got a case where we
16:57
already have somebody that tested
16:58
positive and we’re gonna work our way
17:00
down that list until we get to every
17:02
single
17:03
those folks what about prisons should
17:06
testing be mandated there as well we are
17:09
where we’ve taken all kinds of steps to
17:11
reduce our prison population we’ve set
17:13
up triage centers we’ve set up isolation
17:16
sections in the hospitals and we’re
17:18
doing testing of hospital staff that’s
17:20
one of our top priorities and that’s
17:22
included in our kind of clusters and
17:24
hotspots where we’re focusing some of
17:26
these tests first so it’s things like
17:28
prisons it’s things like nursing homes
17:31
also on health care workers they’re
17:35
gonna get prioritized for tests and then
17:37
this issue like I talked about today we
17:39
have a big poultry industry on our
17:40
Maryland’s Eastern Shore we have a major
17:42
outbreak there and interruption of the
17:44
food chain so we’re we’re setting up
17:46
this new thing there for the for the
17:48
workers in the poultry industry at
17:49
Perdue at the Perdue plant and at
17:52
Purdue’s Stadium in Salisbury let’s
17:54
pause on that food issue we got an email
17:57
from one of our readers of the post Milo
17:59
Williams from Maryland she said quote I
18:01
heard there’s no risk to Maryland’s food
18:03
supply train but grocery stores are
18:05
still out of stock of many items I
18:07
switch to having my groceries delivered
18:08
but a lot of times my delivery is not
18:11
arriving because things are out of stock
18:12
what’s being done yeah I think that’s
18:16
there there is no interruption in the
18:18
food chain and that’s not sort of
18:20
unrelated to what I we do have a concern
18:23
with this poultry industry issue that
18:26
same you’ve heard about it nationally
18:27
with pork producers and beef producers
18:29
and now poultry producers to make sure
18:31
there’s no interruption in that food
18:33
chain which is a big national issue here
18:35
locally we’re concerned about the
18:37
workers and the spreading this into the
18:39
community and about our poultry farmers
18:41
and what it does to our economy on the
18:43
this issue that your your reader is
18:47
asking about the stocks not being filled
18:51
that’s a problem that’s we’re continuing
18:53
to try to work with all of these supply
18:56
chain folks to make sure they keep being
18:58
filled some of it is a problems with
19:02
distribution but some of it is simply
19:04
people rushing out and and hoarding
19:06
because of concern about things running
19:08
out so they’re buying too much and
19:10
clearing out their shelves and but it’s
19:13
an issue that we continue to work with
19:14
all the stores in the supply
19:16
to try to improve upon to make sure that
19:19
this shelves remain stocked but there if
19:21
there isn’t a concern so people should
19:23
just buy what they need and not be you
19:26
know wiping out the shelves and taking
19:28
everything we just have a couple more
19:30
minutes here Governor Hogan so maybe for
19:33
some brief answers one we got a note
19:35
from Steve Larson from Maryland will the
19:37
beaches be open in Ocean City this
19:39
summer I know that the Ocean City mayor
19:43
and city council have been meeting and
19:45
talking about this it’s really it’s
19:47
really too early to tell I think there
19:49
probably will be some hope for some kind
19:52
of a season in Ocean City but whether
19:53
it’ll be normal that’s a big question
19:55
about how they’re gonna go about opening
19:57
opening opening beaches in a safe way
20:00
what would you mandate face coverings
20:03
masks during a reopening of Maryland is
20:06
certainly it depends on that’s one of
20:08
the things that our plan and visions
20:10
were working with industry sectors
20:12
depending on what the work is and how
20:15
closely their affiliates certain and
20:16
certainly in some places you are gonna
20:18
have to wear masks until we find a
20:20
vaccine or a cure homelessness is an
20:24
issue rent and mortgage payments are an
20:25
issue 50 Democratic lawmakers on
20:27
Wednesday praised you they also called
20:29
on you to cancel rent and mortgage
20:31
payments for residents and businesses
20:32
hurt by the pandemic will you do that
20:34
haven’t seen the letter yet from the
20:36
legislature legislatures I just I saw
20:39
that clip this morning in the news but
20:42
we have worked very closely to make sure
20:45
that people are suffering during this
20:46
time and we put a pause on evictions it
20:49
was one of the first things I did on
20:50
addictions and foreclosures so that
20:52
nobody came and nobody can have their
20:54
utilities cut off nobody can be evicted
20:56
nobody can be foreclosed on and we’re
20:58
gonna try to work with the lenders and
21:00
with landlords or at work through this
21:02
as we come out of this crisis because
21:04
certainly everybody’s been hurt
21:06
economically you just had a special
21:08
congressional election on Tuesday in
21:10
your state what was that experience like
21:13
and do you would you like to see all
21:15
mail-in voting this fall I just had a
21:19
good call yesterday with Congressman to
21:21
be kwazy and fumet who was elected to
21:23
fill the seat of Elijah Cummings the
21:25
election went very well I was sort of
21:27
surprised it was all done by mail with a
21:29
few exceptions of
21:30
people that didn’t have fixed addresses
21:31
or people that needed to go out in
21:33
person and it went if it came off
21:35
surprisingly well without a glitch and
21:38
you know we’re going to encourage people
21:39
in the June primary that that’s coming
21:41
up for the rest of the state to vote by
21:43
mail there will be the opportunity for
21:45
those who can’t have one polling place
21:47
each county for folks that for example
21:49
like they’re blind or don’t have a fixed
21:51
address that need to get out but most
21:53
people we want them to vote by mail it’s
21:55
the we want to have every vote counted
21:56
but we want people to be expressing
21:58
their vote and making their decisions in
22:00
a safe way final question here the last
22:03
time I visited with you in Annapolis it
22:06
was a for a political story you decided
22:08
not to run for president you were
22:10
thinking through the idea at the time
22:12
this week it was just announced that
22:14
congressman Justin Amash of Michigan is
22:16
considering a third party run would you
22:19
be willing to support him are you
22:20
leaning toward Vice President Biden or
22:23
President Trump you know in the middle
22:26
of the pandemic you know I haven’t quite
22:28
frankly Bob spent a lot of time thinking
22:30
about politics I think I know there’s an
22:32
election going on but my focus is on
22:35
trying to keep the people in my safe
22:36
state and running the NGA which is a
22:38
nonpartisan organization that requires
22:41
me to stay out of politics for a while
22:43
so I’ll pass on that question and we’ll
22:46
figure that out in November I’ll ask you
22:49
about that at some point though in the
22:50
coming months I’m sure about it I’m sure
22:52
you worried Thank You Governor Hogan for
22:55
joining us here at Washington Post live
22:56
we appreciate your time thank you Bob
22:58
thank you and thank all of you for
23:01
watching tune in tomorrow at Washington
23:03
Post live at 11:00 a.m. Eastern to catch
23:05
Post columnist David Ignatius he’s gonna
23:08
be in conversation with Ford Motor
23:09
Company CEO Jim Hackett for more
23:12
information on that and other programs
23:14
go to Washington Post live.com and
23:16
register but for now I’m Bob Costas
23:19
stay well and stay safe