Marianne Williamson Knows How to Beat Trump

We need an uprising of decency.

If only …

If only Donald Trump were not president, we could have an interesting debate over whether private health insurance should be illegal. If only Trump were not president, we could have an interesting debate over who was softest on crime in the 1990s. If only Trump were not president, we could have a nice argument about the pros and cons of NAFTA.

But Trump is president, and this election is not about those things. This election is about who we are as a people, our national character. This election is about the moral atmosphere in which we raise our children.

Trump is a cultural revolutionary, not a policy revolutionary. He operates and is subtly changing America at a much deeper level. He’s operating at the level of dominance and submission, at the level of the person where fear stalks and contempt emerges.

He’s redefining what you can say and how a leader can act. He’s reasserting an old version of what sort of masculinity deserves to be followed and obeyed. In Freudian terms, he’s operating on the level of the id. In Thomistic terms, he is instigating a degradation of America’s soul.

Richard Thaler with Malcolm Gladwell on Misbehaving

Behavioral economist Richard Thaler talks to bestselling author Malcolm Gladwell on the implications of behavioral economics on how we think about the world, from our personal lives to business to society. They will have you retooling your grocery list and retirement strategies, and lead managers to rethink every aspect of their business.

 

 

60:30
this is an important point someone who
has always been the the A+ student this
the court feel are the obvious smartest
kid in the room right golden boy is
someone who is who is not powerfully
motivated to disrupt the status quo
right right right is rare going I see
where you’re going
look no I think it’s an obvious point
that if I were if I had been really good
at doing economics I wouldn’t have had
to do this you know all right
I mean I sure when Rosen my advisor I
quote him in the in in an article in The
New York Times he told the reporter who
asked about my career as a grad student
quote we didn’t expect much of him yeah
and you it’s always good to have you
I think it’s been pure
stupidity that we haven’t been building
roads bridges and so forth
for the last seven years when we we
could we can borrow at a negative
interest rate and use otherwise idle

resources I mean it’s just mind boggling
that we haven’t done that and and you
don’t have to be a Keynesian to think

that so whether or not this would
stimulate the economy let’s just suppose

we do just cost-benefit analysis we have
bridges that are all going to fall down
all around the country we could be
building them with construction crews
that have nothing to do and borrowing at
zero interest rate and we’re going to
have to do start doing it as soon as the
economy picks up when it will cost a lot
more so complete stupidity

Ignorance Abounds About Supply-Side Economics

The movement’s main founder, Robert A. Mundell, wrote prolifically on the subject avant la lettre in top economics journals in the 1960s and 1970s. Mundell’s protégé at the University of Chicago, Arthur B. Laffer, did the same, then branched out to a consulting business where he put out some 50 papers per year that dilated on supply-side economics.

Archives? The Hoover Institution in California has hundreds of boxes of papers of the first journalistic supply-siders, Wall Street Journal editor Robert L. Bartley and his assistant Jude Wanniski. As for supply-side economics’ Congressional lodestar, Jack Kemp, there are more boxes on end at the Library of Congress.

I looked and looked at all this stuff, and a definition emerged clear as the sky. This was that supply-side economics favored a particular way of solving the kind of recessions we have been prone to since the founding of the Federal Reserve and the income tax, both in the year 1913. This is to stabilize the dollar and cut taxes.

This definition—stabilize money and cut taxes—was repeated so often, so uniformly, and over so much time by the original supply-siders that it became possible to identify a canonical statement, the Ur-document, the quintessential rendering of the supply-siders as to their philosophy.

This is it, from a paper Mundell wrote in 1971: “The correct policy mix is based on fiscal ease to get more production out of the economy, in combination with monetary restraint….The increased momentum of the economy provided by…a tax cut will cause a sufficient demand for credit to permit real monetary expansion at higher interest rates.

As for details, to a one the supply-siders favored tax cuts of the marginal and capital-gains variety, and monetary stability in the form of a gold-anchored dollar.

Readers of this column can be forgiven for asking if I haven’t been repeating myself. Haven’t I availed of the above Mundell quotation in recent columns, keen to point out that supply-side economics is a policy mix of two things, stable money and marginal tax cuts?

Indeed I am repeating myself—for an all too appropriate reason.

Last week, for the umpteenth time, a major, credentialed economist wrote an article, one read far and wide, contending that supply-side economics has to do exclusively with tax cuts. There is probably no bigger economics blogger than Mark Thoma, and marginal-tax-cuts-equal-supply-side-economics is what he made his supposition in “Why the GOP Won’t Admit Supply-Side Econ Has Failed.”

You can click on the link to see Thoma go about all this, but the essential thing is as follows. There is no credible historical evidence ever produced by a scholar that has served to delink monetary issues from the core doctrine of supply-side economics. In fact, all primary evidence ever produced as to the central claims of supply-side economics has confirmed that supply-siders insisted that monetary restraint and progress toward a gold standard is as crucial as any kind of tax policy. To say otherwise is to speak in the absence of evidence.

But in current circumstances, you see how it can be so…tempting…to say that supply-side economics was only ever a policy of tax cuts. This is because the George W. Bush tax cuts—those things on the chopping block in this fiscal cliff drama—supervised a mere boomlet in the mid-2000s, and then the Great Recession after 2008. If you trash W.’s policy by calling it supply-side, then by association you can discredit the Reagan success too. Conservative economic policy: a comprehensive failure in its decades-long response to Keynes!

Go back to the record ten years ago and see if the supply-siders were unconcerned about monetary issues, as the Bush-era Fed made money as loose as it was in the 1970s. See if Robert Mundell quit on the idea of a unitary dollar-euro exchange rate and an anchor akin to gold. See if the second generation of supply-siders, the next round of journalists and Congressmen (such as Kemp trainee Rep. Paul Ryan) didn’t call out the money-printing 2000s as making the W. tax cuts nothing but a “small, ambiguous reprise” of the great tradition, as I would put it in the book, Econoclasts, which came out in 2009.

But “everyone knows” that supply-side economics’ main, if not exclusive concern was with tax cuts, and that’s good enough for Mark Thoma. Cui bono from burying the true history of the objectives of supply-side economics? Fiscal-cliff corner-cutters and their enablers, but certainly not sincere political economists trying to master our recent history for the purpose of getting our once-great economy back in good repair.